Princeton Tops Yale for Share of Ivy League Title; Harvard Wins

Quinn Epperly threw for three touchdowns and sprinted four yards for a fourth to help Princeton University clinch a share of the Ivy League Conference title with a 59-23 win over Yale University in college football.

Princeton (8-1, 6-0 Ivy) is in sole possession of first place with one game left in the regular season. Harvard, which beat Pennsylvania 38-30 yesterday, has a 5-1 conference record and could still share the title.

In games involving the top 10 Bowl Championship Series teams, it was No. 1 Alabama 20, Mississippi State 7; No. 2 Florida State 59, Syracuse 3; No. 3 Ohio State 60, Illinois 35; Southern California 20, No. 4 Stanford 17; No. 5 Baylor 63, Texas Tech 32; No. 6 Oregon 44, Utah 21; No. 7 Auburn 43, No. 25 Georgia 38; and No. 10 South Carolina 19, Florida 14.

At Princeton Stadium, Epperly threw touchdown passes of 23, 12 and 24 yards and added a four-yard scoring sprint in the third quarter for the Tigers. Dre Nelson carried five times for 77 yards and two touchdowns and Phillip Bhaya returned a 34-yard interception for a touchdown.

Logan Scott threw for 240 yards and three touchdowns and one interception for the Bulldogs (5-4, 3-3 Ivy).

At Harvard Stadium in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Conner Hempel threw for two touchdowns and ran two yards to score in Harvard’s (8-1, 5-1 Ivy) defeat of Pennsylvania (4-5, 3-3 Ivy).

The Crimson held a 31-0 lead at the half as they scored on six of their first eight possessions, including five touchdowns.

The Quakers rallied in the second half, scoring on their next five offensive possessions for 30 points. Ryan Becker threw for 182 yards and two touchdowns and Adam Strouss carried four times for six yards and two touchdowns.

To contact the reporter on this story: Nancy Kercheval in Washington at nkercheval@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Michael Sillup at msillup@bloomberg.net

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