Bill Clinton Says Wife Wants Grandchild More Than Presidency

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton said his wife Hillary Clinton, who was runner-up for the Democratic nomination in 2008, wants to be a grandmother more than she ever wanted the presidency.

Speaking at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland today, the former president was asked what he wants to accomplish in the next decade.

“I’d like to live, I’d like to be a grandfather. I have nothing to do with that achievement, but I would like it,” Clinton, 64, replied, laughing. “I would like to have a happy wife and she won’t be unless she’s a grandmother. It’s something she wants more than she wanted to be president.”

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, 63, has repeatedly ruled out another run for the presidency when asked about her aspirations for the next electoral cycle. The Clintons’ only child, Chelsea Clinton, 30, wed Marc Mezvinsky, 33, a hedge fund manager and son of two former members of the U.S. House of Representatives, last July.

Clinton’s lighthearted personal comments came at the end of an hour-long discussion with WEF founder Klaus Schwab at the global gathering of economic policy makers and executives.

The former president, who serves as the UN Special Envoy for Haiti, criticized the slow pace of rebuilding in the Caribbean nation that has been ravaged by earthquake, disease and political unrest in the last year.

Clinton said this week’s protests in Egypt and the recent revolt in nearby Tunisia reflect a “yearning” in the Mideast and North Africa, and a deep desire among youth to become “part of a modern world that works.”

He also said domestic politics in Israel is interfering with the Jewish state’s ability to make a peace deal with Palestinians. Clinton said a fair two-state solution would be similar to the 2002 Arab Peace Initiative, which offered Israel recognition and peace with its Arab neighbors in exchange for a return of Israel’s occupied territories, an independent Palestinian state and a “just settlement” for Palestinian refugees.

To contact the reporter on this story: Indira Lakshmanan in Washington at ilakshmanan@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Mark Silva at msilva34@bloomberg.net

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