Swiss Voters Reject Proposal to Impose Higher Tax for Top Salary Earners

Switzerland’s voters rejected a proposal to increase taxes for the nation’s top earners, following the recommendations of most national leaders.

In a referendum today, 59 percent of voters turned down the proposal by the Social Democrats to enact minimum taxes on income and wealth. Residents would have paid taxes of at least 22 percent on annual income above 250,000 francs ($249,000), according to the proposed changes.

Switzerland’s executive and parliamentary branches had rejected the proposal, saying it would interfere with the cantons’ tax-autonomy regulations. The changes would also damage the nation’s attractiveness, the government, led by President Doris Leuthard, said before the vote.

The Alpine country’s reputation as a low-tax refuge has attracted bankers and entrepreneurs such as Ingvar Kamprad, the Swedish founder of Ikea AB furniture stores, and members of the Brenninkmeijer family, who owns retailer C&A Group.

To contact the reporters on this story: Klaus Wille in Zurich at kwille@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story: John Fraher at jfraher@bloomberg.net

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