Contributor

Bob Van Voris

Trump’s Business Empire Sends Court Into Uncharted Legal Terrain

Three well-dressed young men sat nervously across the boardroom table from Lord Alan Sugar, billionaire founder of the Amstrad electronics company. They’d made a hash of their assigned task: selling burgers on the street in London’s Brixton neighborhood.

What You Need to Know About the ‘Emoluments Clause’

America’s founding fathers probably didn’t envision Donald Trump. They did, however, think to include a sentence in the U.S. Constitution that could curb the activities of a businessman-president. Trump’s decision to keep his stakes in his global business, the Trump Organization, raised the question of whether he is continually violating what’s known as the "emoluments clause." Critics of the president have filed lawsuits pressing the case. And he’s not the only Trump raising emoluments question

Anthony Weiner Sentenced to 21 Months in Prison

Anthony Weiner was sentenced to 21 months in prison for exchanging sexually explicit messages with a 15-year-old girl, capping the spectacular fall of the former congressman whose self-destructive behavior wrecked his career and marriage and played a role in the final days of the 2016 presidential campaign.

Groups Want Trump to Account for Sparse Mar-a-Lago Records

Three public interest groups are seeking to force the Trump administration to account for its failure to turn over records of presidential visitors at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida, one of the groups, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, said in a statement Wednesday.

Anthony Weiner Blames Legal Woes on Untreated Addiction, Victim

Anthony Weiner, the former congressman and New York mayoral candidate whose career and personal life were wrecked in a series of sexting scandals, blamed a “deep sickness” combined with the “profit-seeking curiosity” of his 15-year-old victim for his legal troubles, as he asked a judge for leniency when he’s sentenced later this month.

What Is a ‘Bona Fide’ Tie Under Trump’s Travel Ban?

President Donald Trump scored a partial win when the U.S. Supreme Court approved implementation of a narrowed version of his travel ban on refugees for 120 days and nationals from six Muslim-majority countries for 90 days. The Supreme Court says it will hear arguments on the ban, which was blocked by lower courts, as soon as October. In the meantime, it allowed the administration to enforce the prohibition against foreigners who lack a "bona fide" relationship with the U.S. The high court on Jul

Trump Immigration Ban Meets Law of Unintended Consequences

President Donald Trump says his travel restrictions are aimed at keeping the U.S. safe from radical Islamic terrorism, while critics accuse him of imposing a Muslim ban. Whatever the short-term executive order accomplishes, following multiple revisions and months of court challenges, its impact on immigration policy and practices will be felt for years to come. Some winners and losers in this new regime are obvious, but there may also be some surprises.

What Happens to Trump’s Travel Ban Now?

President Donald Trump scored a partial win when the U.S. Supreme Court approved implementation of a narrowed version of his travel ban on refugees for 120 days and nationals from six Muslim-majority countries for 90 days. The Supreme Court says it will hear arguments on the ban, which was blocked by lower courts, as soon as October. In the meantime, it allowed the administration to enforce the prohibition against foreigners who lack a "bona fide" relationship with the U.S. Then in a defeat for

A Guide to Legal Issues in the Trump Travel Ban Fight

President Donald Trump’s second attempt at a travel ban was partially revived by a June 26 ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court. The court, as soon as October, will consider appeals of rulings by two lower appeals courts based in San Francisco and Richmond, Virginia, that had stopped the ban. The ban bars residents of six mostly Muslim countries from entering the U.S. for 90 days and all refugees for 120 days. The Supreme Court allowed it to take effect except for individuals who have a connection t

Ivanka Trump Must Answer Questions in ‘Wild Thing’ Shoe Suit

Ivanka Trump must answer questions in a lawsuit over whether her company ripped off a rival’s shoe design, as a judge rejected her claim that she’s too busy as a “high-ranking government official” in the White House to sit for a deposition.

Why Sessions Might Use Executive Privilege Shield: QuickTake Q&A

For the second time in two weeks, a witness who could have plenty to say about U.S. President Donald Trump is getting ready to testify before the Senate committee investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and whether Trump or his associates were involved. And for the second time, the presidential prerogative known as executive privilege looms over the proceedings. Trump didn’t try to assert that privilege to prevent former FBI director James Comey from testifying. But Atto

Executive Privilege Was a Trump Long Shot Anyway: QuickTake Q&A

U.S. President Donald Trump would have faced legal and political risks had he tried to block former FBI director James Comey from testifying before the Senate committee investigating Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential election and whether Trump or his associates were involved. Would the law have allowed Trump to use executive privilege -- a presidential prerogative that has evolved over time -- to muzzle Comey? Trump’s own words and actions might have undermined his case. And does Trump w

Weiner Pleads Guilty in ‘Sexting’ Case Linked to Election

Anthony Weiner pleaded guilty to sending sexually explicit messages to a 15-year-old girl, capping a staggering downfall for the former Congressman and New York mayoral candidate and resolving a case that played a major role in the final days of the 2016 presidential election.

Everything You Need to Know About Impeachment: QuickTake Q&A

Impeachment talk is in the air in Washington. That doesn’t mean lawmakers are going to act, and they almost certainly won’t act soon. But reports that President Donald Trump asked FBI director James Comey to halt an investigation, before firing him, have led some legal scholars and former prosecutors to argue that Trump’s actions are reaching impeachment-level. The Republicans who control Congress, and even most Democrats, aren’t yet ready to proclaim that Trump committed the "high crimes and mi

Secret Service Sued Over Trump Residence Visitor Logs

A group led by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington sued the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to get access to Secret Service logs of visits to the White House and President Donald Trump’s other occasional residences, the Mar-a-Lago club in Florida and Trump Tower in New York City.

Legal Issues in the Trump Travel Ban Fight: QuickTake Scorecard

President Donald Trump’s second attempt at a travel ban was temporarily blocked by judges in Maryland and Hawaii March 15, just hours before it was to take effect. The judge in Hawaii two weeks later extended the halt until a decision is made on a permanent injunction or a higher court overturns his ruling. Trump’s second directive, issued March 6, was intended to fix legal problems with his Jan. 27 order that tried to close U.S. borders to refugees and citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries.

Trump's Words May Haunt Him as Travel Ban Appeal Promised

Donald Trump’s administration will soon appeal a court ruling that blocked a revised travel ban, White House spokesman Sean Spicer said. But the appeal might carry risks as Trump’s own words could come back to haunt him in court.

What New Travel Ban Means for Legal Battle: QuickTake Q&A

President Donald Trump signed a new executive order on immigration March 6, rather than continue fighting court challenges to his Jan. 27 order closing U.S. borders to refugees and citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries. He had said the new order would be tailored to address the objections of the judges who barred enforcement of the original one. The revised order affects fewer people and so narrows the pool of litigants who can challenge it in court. Still, it will almost certainly face cont

Travel Ban Aside, Trump Has Vast Legal Arsenal for Deporting Millions

Whether President Donald Trump’s ban against travelers from seven Muslim majority countries is saved by revision or scrapped by the courts, he’ll still have a vast legal arsenal at his disposal for limiting immigration into the U.S. and deporting millions of undocumented people.

Can Trump Fix His Travel Ban Executive Order?: QuickTake Q&A

President Donald Trump plans to sign a new executive order on immigration, perhaps this week, rather than continue fighting court challenges to his Jan. 27 order closing U.S. borders to refugees and citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries. The new order, he said, will be tailored to address the objections of the judges who barred enforcement of the original one.

Trump Foes Head to Court to Block Nearly Every Stroke of His Pen

Battles raging from the halls of Congress to street rallies nationwide are challenging President Donald Trump’s vision of America with partisan sound bites and snarky signs. But the strongest revolt may be less raucous, though no less pointed: lawsuits by pro bono lawyers, advocacy groups and state attorneys general.

Why ‘Emoluments’ Might Mean Headaches for Trump: QuickTake Q&A

America’s founding fathers probably didn’t envision Donald Trump. They did, however, think to include a sentence in the U.S. Constitution that today strikes some critics as an appropriate check on the businessman-president. Chatter about the provision, known as the "emoluments clause," has intensified following Trump’s inauguration, his decision to keep his stakes in the Trump Organization, and a lawsuit by a government watchdog group. The first challenge may be determining what, exactly, the cl

What New Trump Travel Ban Means for Legal Battle: QuickTake Q&A

President Donald Trump signed a new executive order on immigration March 6, rather than continue fighting court challenges to his Jan. 27 order closing U.S. borders to refugees and citizens of seven mostly Muslim countries. He had said the new order would be tailored to address the objections of the judges who barred enforcement of the original one. The revised order affects fewer people and so narrows the pool of plaintiffs who can challenge it in court. Still, it faces a new round of litigatio

White House Immigration Ban Promises Constitutional Showdown

Did President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration ban Muslims from the country on the basis of their religion? That will be a central question when federal judges dig more deeply into the constitutionality of the order, signed on Jan. 27. If the answer is yes, it appears vulnerable to a First Amendment challenge.

Judges Block Parts of Trump’s Order on Muslim Immigration

Two judges temporarily blocked President Donald Trump’s administration from enforcing parts of his order to halt immigration from seven Middle Eastern countries, after a day in which students, refugees and dual citizens were stuck overseas or detained and some businesses warned employees from those countries not to risk leaving the U.S.

White House Defends Immigrant Ban After Travelers Stopped

President Donald Trump’s administration said it would allow two Iraqis detained at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York to enter the U.S., as it defended its handling of an order signed Friday that suspended refugee resettlements and barred entry to immigrants from seven Middle East nations.

Judge to Release Warrant in Hillary Clinton E-Mail Probe

A federal judge in New York Monday said he’ll release the FBI’s warrant and application that enabled the agency to search for e-mails linked to former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton on a laptop computer used by Clinton aide Huma Abedin and her estranged husband Anthony Weiner.