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Opinion
Conor Sen

Millennials Need a New Housing Bubble

If demand keeps outstripping supply, prices for existing homes will skyrocket and wages in construction will soar.
Build, baby, build.

Build, baby, build.

Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

To understand the slow-motion trends in single-family housing, start by looking at the oil market: It took years of oil priced around $100 a barrel to spur the investments that drove higher production, leading to the current supply-driven glut and prices closer to $50 a barrel. The levers of supply and demand worked, but they worked slowly -- as is happening in the housing market.

Every year since 2009 we've been running a housing deficit: More housing for sale has been absorbed than built. With a glut of housing left over from the housing bubble and the great recession, it's logical that construction of new supply was subdued for a few years. But vacant inventory for sale normalized in 2012, and currently stands at a 12-year low. So why aren't builders building more? The pace of construction remains far below the rate of household creation.