Maria’s Trail of Destruction in Puerto Rico

A picture of unprecedented environmental devestation.
Bloomberg News

Puerto Rico Governor Ricardo Rossello has called Hurricane Maria “the most devastating storm in a century.” The Category 4 hurricane made landfall on Sept. 20, 2017, knocking out power across the island and, within hours, wiping out nearly 80 percent of the territory’s crop value. Amid their struggles to recover from Hurricane Maria, some Puerto Rico residents found it befuddling that President Donald Trump fired off a number of Twitter rants about professional athletes on Saturday—yet made no mention of their dire situation. (Updated: Sept. 28, 2017)

In this handout image provided by the U.S.Navy, U.S. Marines assigned to Battalion Landing Team, 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU), exit U.S. Navy Landing Craft, Utility 1657 to assist in relief efforts for victims of Hurricane Maria in Ceiba, Puerto Rico, Sept. 24, 2017.

Photographer: U.S. Navy via Getty Images

Crowley shipping containers with supplies for Hurricane Maria recovery  at the port of San Juan in Puerto Rico on Sept. 27, 2017.

Photographer: Xavier Araujo/GFR via AP Photo

A Container ship entering the bay of San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 26, 2017.

Photographer: Ramon Tonito Zayas/GFR via AP Photo

Barefoot Davis, left, who lives on St. Thomas but has not been back to see the damage, helps the crew of East Island Excursions load boats with supplies headed for St. Thomas and St. John in Fajardo, Puerto Rico on Sep. 12, 2017. Volunteers were on the docks repackaging a variety of relief supplies into plastic boxes that can more easily make the journey across the Caribbean Sea to the islands, where Hurricane Irma slammed the region as a Category 5 storm last week.

Photographer: Boston Globe via Getty Images

In this image provided by the U.S. Navy, sailors and Marines attached to the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU), embarked aboard the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), unload military field rations, known as MRE or meals, ready to eat, from an MV-22 Osprey aircraft at Luis Munoz Marin International Airport in San Juan, Puerto Rico on Sept. 25, 2017.

Photographer: MC3 Michael Eduardo Jorge/U.S. Navy via AP Photo

Members of the Venezuelan Civil Protection load supplies with humanitarian aid for the island of Dominica after the Caribbean island was battered by Hurricane Maria, at the international airport of Caracas, on Sept. 19, 2017.

Photographer: Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

A U.S. Coast Guard cutter is seen in port as people deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Maria on Sept. 25, 2017 in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

In this handout imade provided by the U.S.Navy, U.S. Navy Landing Craft, Utility 1654, transporting relief supplies, personnel and equipment to Puerto Rico, exits the well deck of the amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3) in the Caribbean Sea, Sept. 26, 2017.

Photographer: U.S. Navy via Getty Images

U.S. Coast Guard personnel help offload relief supplies from an HC-130 plane at the San Juan International Airport after Hurricane Maria passed through the area on Sept. 22, 2017.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A Crowley cargo ship at Isla Grande terminal in San Juan, Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria hit on Sept. 27, 2017.

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg

José A. Rivera, right, and his brother José Ramón Rivera look over their destroyed plantain crops in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico, Sept. 24, 2017. In a matter of hours, Hurricane Maria wiped out about 80 percent of the crop value in Puerto Rico, making it one of the costliest storms to hit the island's agriculture industry. “There is no more agriculture in Puerto Rico,” José A. Rivera said. “And there won’t be any for a year or longer.”

Photographer: Victor J. Blue/The New York Times via Redux

Aerial photo of the floading in the costal town of Loiza, in the north shore of Puerto Rico on Sept. 22, 2017. 

Photographer: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo/The Washington Post via Getty Images

A tattoo that reads “Family” on a resident who is using a cell phone in an area that has service on Puerto Rico Highway 22 after Hurricane Maria in Dorado, Puerto Rico, on Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017.

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg

More than 500 residents of San Juan sheltered at Roberto Clemente Coliseum, the biggest shelter in the island, on Sept, 19, 2017.

Photographer: The Washington Post via Getty Images

Buildings are completely dark during a total blackout after Hurricane Maria made landfall Sept. 20, 2017, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

A boy in flood waters after Hurricane Maria at Condado in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 20, 2017.

Photographer: Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Dead horses  on the side of the road after the passing of Hurricane Maria, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2017. Because of the heavy rains brought by Maria, thousands of people were evacuated from Toa Baja after the municipal government opened the gates of the Rio La Plata Dam.

Photographer: Carlos Giusti/AP Photo

A woman at a shelter after being evacuated from a home near the damaged Guajataca Dam after Hurricane Maria in Isabella, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 23, 2017. 

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg

Residents wait for fuel with gas canisters after Hurricane Maria in Quebradillas, Puerto Rico, Sept. 23, 2017. 

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg

 A resident stands at her doorstep as she looks at strong waves in Saint-Pierre, on the French Caribbean island of Martinique, after it too was hit by Hurricane Maria, on Sept. 19, 2017. Martinique suffered power outages but, unlike Puerto Rico, avoided major damage.

Photographer: Lionel Chamoiseau/AFP via Getty Images

Residents wade through flood waters at their home days after Hurricane Maria made landfall, on Sept. 22, 2017, in Loiza, Puerto Rico. 

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Getty Images

People are transported down a road flooded by Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. 

Photographer: Hector Ratamal/AFP via Getty Images

Damaged boats in dry dock are seen in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Fajardo, Puerto Rico, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017. 

Photographer: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Cars drive through a flooded road in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017. 

Photographer: Ricardo Arduengo/AFP via Getty Images

Men carry Delia Pineda, 89, from Salto Arriba, as they evacuate her from an area cut off from Utuado, on Sept. 23, 2017. In the mountain town of Utuado, residents are struggling to recover. There is no running water, so people are collecting water from mountain springs. The main north-south road has completely washed out in one section, leaving people on the south side cut off.

Photographer: Carolyn Cole/LA Times via Getty Images

Vicente Sanabria and Elizabeth Serrano survived the floods together at a house in Levittown with other neighbors, in Toa Baja, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 21, 2017.

Photographer: Dennis M. Rivera Pichardo/The Washington Post via Getty Images

U.S. Coast Guard personnel offload relief supplies at the San Juan International Airport on Sept. 22, 2017, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People use cell phones in an area that has service on Puerto Rico Highway 22 after Hurricane Maria in Dorado, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 23, 2017.

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg

A resident shovels debris after Hurricane Maria in Arecibo, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 23, 2017. 

Photographer: Alex Wroblewski/Bloomberg

Danalys Luna and Edgardo Feliciano wash their clothes in a stream on Sept. 24, 2017, in Aibonito, Puerto Rico, as people wait for the electrical and water grids to be repaired .

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Power authority workers fix power lines after Hurricane Maria at PR-177 in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on Sept. 22, 2017.

Photographer: Anadolu Agency via Getty Images