Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg
Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

Solar Eclipse Awes America With a Glimpse of Totality

Millions of Americans across a 70-mile-wide swath from Oregon to South Carolina on Monday watched the moon pass in front of the sun and, ultimately, cover it altogether, except for a fiery nimbus at its edge. Millions more outside the path of totality beheld a partial eclipse, still stunning as the moon took a healthy bite of our star. Tiny rural towns swelled by thousands as eclipse chasers traveled hundreds of miles to watch the spectacle, a vivid version of the spheres held up in science class to show the clockwork of the universe. In cities, office workers dashed down from their urban perches to gather on street corners, passing around protective glasses and fiddling with pinhole projector boxes hastily assembled ahead of the milestone. 

A line marks ideal viewing points as Makanda, Illinois, prepares for its total solar eclipse.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

A member of Southern Illinois University's astronomy club tests a telescope ahead of the total eclipse in Carbondale, Illinois.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Eclipse-viewing glasses for sale at a crafts fair on the campus of SIU.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

A weather balloon with monitoring equipment is prepared for launch.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Eclipse glasses as a photo filter. 

Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

The hot ball in the sky, partly eclipsed.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

A cheerleader tests a pair of protective glasses ahead of the big event.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Spectators arrive for the viewing.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Visitors behold the eclipse through special protective glasses. 

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

iPhone and glasses.

Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

A spectator marvels. 

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

An umbrella provides shade in the 90-degree heat at SIU.

 

 

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Spectators mill about the campus.

 

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

A sliver of the sun remains visible through a passing cloud.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

The eclipse stopped daily routines and enchanted Americans across the country. A spectator at SIU.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

At the California Independent System Operator (ISO), in Folsom, California.

Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg

Visitors are silhouetted against the sky and cellphone screens dot the crowd.

 

 

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Totality. Or darn near it.

Photographer: Daniel Acker/Bloomberg