Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg
Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

What You Missed at the Mobile World Congress 2017

Mobile World Congress, the annual technology and telecom trade show, takes place once again this week in the heart of Barcelona. Thanks to the meteoric growth in importance mobile devices and services have had within the global economy, MWC's place on the tech calendar is second only to Las Vegas's Consumer Electronics Show in January. And to some, Barcelona's show is the most important of the year. Photographs by Chris Ratcliffe and Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

Although 2017's installment lacks big-hit announcements, more than 100,000 people are expected to descend on MWC's halls. Samsung, LG, Sony and even Nokia have already made great impressions, and more are likely as the week progresses.

Huawei updated its flagship line, introducing the P10 phone with Leica camera technology and curved edges at its own event on Sunday. The company has vowed to displace Apple and Samsung from the top of the global smartphone rankings in five years, aiming for market share of 25 percent globally.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

First launched in 2000, the Nokia 3310 featured a small monochrome display and became known for its durability. It went on to sell millions of handsets. The revamped, slimmer version now has a color screen, but many of the phone’s basic features remain. The phone will have original games such as Snake, as well as new features including a camera, will sell for about 49 euros.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

An attendee tries the Samsung Gear Virtual Reality experience on the opening day of the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona.

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

Huawei CEO Richard Yu launches the company's Watch 2 smartwatch. The device is one of the first to run Google's latest Android Wear 2 operating system, which places it as a chief competitor to the Apple Watch.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Attendees take photographs ahead of the Samsung news conference. ​The company teased its coming Galaxy S8 smartphone and released new tablets targeting video-gamers and professionals as the company seeks to regain ground lost after pulling its Note 7 from shelves last year.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Samsung executive Mark Notton, left, holds a Galaxy Tab S3 tablet during the company's news conference. The tablet is meant for entertainment and has a 9.7-inch Amoled screen, quad-stereo speakers and lets users play 4K video.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

An attendee uses an HTC Vive VR headset on the opening day of MWC.

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son, sporting a black turtleneck similar in style to the late Steve Jobs, laid out his vision for the future of technology and called for partners to help make it happen 

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

An attendee uses a new Samsung S Pen on one of the company's Galaxy S3 tablets. The aesthetics are based on the classic Staedtler Noris pencil used in classrooms around the world, except now it can be used to write and sketch on digital devices.

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

Netflix CEO Reed Hastings said the company is working on better video codecs to reduce need for bandwidth while improving viewing quality on mobile devices during an interview with radio presenter Francine Stock.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Attendees during the BlackBerry launch event held to showcase the new KeyOne -- a smartphone with a traditional BlackBerry keyboard and functionality, only now built in partnership with manufacturer TCL. One for the BlackBerry faithful alone.

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

A pedestrian takes a selfie outside the conference center.

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

The Blackberry KeyOne. Like many BlackBerrys, the selling point is the traditional keyboard. It also includes a 12-megapixel camera and a Qualcomm processor. It runs on Google's Android OS rather than the older BlackBerry OS. 

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

Attendees rest up ahead of a news conference.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

LG hosted an event to show off its new G6 smartphone with and edge-to-edge display -- no plastic or metal bezel around it. LG is angling to steal the show at this year’s Mobile World Congress, ushering in new smartphones that each hopes will fill a void created by the absence of a new handset from the usually dominant Samsung Electronics Co.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

Workers wait for attendees at the cloakroom ahead of the Samsung Electronics Co. news conference.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

An armed member of the national Catalan police stands guard outside of the conference center.

Photographer: Pau Barrena/Bloomberg

Mobile security company DarkMatter launches their super-secure KATIM smartphone.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg

The autonomous Robocar, developed by Roborace, is unveiled on the opening day of the Mobile World Congress.

Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg