Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits
Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

Touring Super Yacht Miami's Multimillion-Dollar Ships

While the Progressive Miami International Boat Show drew upward of 100,000 participants, Super Yacht Miami, a satellite event, catered to deep-pocketed VIPs. Here, we peek behind the curtain of a few mega-yachts for the ultra-wealthy.

For the past five days (Feb. 16–20), South Florida has been the center of the watercraft universe. Barefoot boat owners could be seen mingling with tens of thousands of admirers at the Progressive Miami International Boat Show at Miami's Marine Stadium, while a better-heeled set of yacht builders and brokers kept to a mile-long stretch of docks near the Fountainbleau for Yachts Miami Beach.

For ultra-VIPs (read: those properly vetted as having more than $500,000 a week to charter a superyacht, or millions to buy one) more than 20 floating mansions were parked for a second year at Islands Gardens Deep Harbour for Super Yacht Miami, a show-within-a-show of sorts. Here, boats up to 500 feet long can dock. We were able to climb aboard a few for a look at luxe mahogany and marble interiors, on-board wine cellars and humidors, and the most powerful marine diesel engines money can buy.

Brokers and invited guests had the chance to tour hundreds of millions of dollars worth of superyachts during the show. Some came to buy, some came to rent for summer and winter escapes, and others, we imagine, just came to dream.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

Members of the crew clean the windows of Skyfall, a 58-meter (193-foot) beauty back for a second year. Summertime price tag: approximately $292,500 per week. 

Built for thrill-seekers (Skyfall's name is a Bond reference, after all), the yacht commands a top speed of 21 knots and comes stocked with plenty of toys: wakeboards, paddleboards, wave-riders, water skis, and more. Here's a regulation basketball hoop on the back deck—provided you're not using the space for a helicopter

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

One of the dining areas on Double Down, which just underwent a $6 million refit, including Sapele mahogany in the main living room. Here, the outdoor/indoor dining area (seats 14), with glass walls that slide back. The dining table has two huge Lazy Susans controlled by a switch under the table.

 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

Owner John Rosatti and his girlfriend, Zuzana, enjoy Champagne on board the Double Down during the first day of the Super Yacht Miami show.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

A renovated stateroom on the Double Down. "We don't fill up all the nine state rooms, but we'll have a couple of couples and enjoy sight-seeing," said owner John Rosatti, burger entrepreneur of BurgerFi fame. "We have a five-star chef on the boat. I gained 20 pounds last year eating on the boat," he said to a chorus of laughter.

 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

The cockpit of Double Down, with dramatic blue leather seats. Also on the bridge deck is a cinema room that is sometimes converted to a massage parlor lit by candles. An elevator connects all four levels, except the sundeck.

 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

The sun deck on Double Down features a treadmill and a cool-down shower, as well as plenty of room to stretch out. Nearby, on the bridge deck, is a Jacuzzi, bar .and Dolcevita barbecue. Price tag: $455,000 to $495,000 a week, with winters in the Caribbean and summers in the Mediterranean.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

Double Down owner Rosatti slides into his shoes after descending from his 213-foot vessel. Guests and potential buyers are asked to take off their shoes before boarding any of the yachts. 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

The nine largest yachts this year measured from 173 to 230 feet. Axioma, at 240 feet, ended up not showing as planned.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

Guests board the brand new Quinta Essentia. The 180-foot yacht comes with a hammam and a helipad, plus deep, wooden soaking tubs and red detailing that refers to the owner's Italian wine estate. Price tag: $40 million. 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

The 230-foot Martha Ann (right) turned out to be the largest ship at the show. Price tag: $79 million.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

The main guest entryway—and elevator—on board the Martha Ann features marble floors; elsewhere, you'll find onyx countertops. On board is a gym, an "endless" pool, a cinema, a swim-up bar, and plenty of outdoor decks to relax on. 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

One of the main dining areas on the Martha Ann.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

François Zuretti designed the somewhat baroque, wood-heavy interiors for the Martha Ann. Here, one of the ship's multiple salons. There's even a baby grand player piano.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

Intricate handcrafted woodwork and custom furniture (such as this chaise in the main cabin), along with gold accents and silk carpeting are hallmarks of the Italianate Zuretti design.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

The Martha Ann underwent a refit in 2014. Here, her dining room. The ship's seven staterooms can accommodate up to 18 guests. 

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits

At Super Yacht Miami, a private show-within-a-show of Yachts Miami Beach, some 20 vessels were on display at Islands Gardens Deep Harbour in Biscayne Bay.

Photographer: Scott McIntyre/Bloomberg Pursuits