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At Tesla, robots install the seats. That’s unusual.

At Tesla, robots install the seats. That’s unusual.

Photographer: Balazs Gardi for Bloomberg Businessweek
Businessweek
Hyperdrive

Inside Tesla’s Model 3 Factory

If Elon Musk can make this dance of robots and people work, it will change how cars are made.

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On the Model 3 body line on a Tuesday afternoon in early June, everything is still. Tesla Inc. is just coming off a week of downtime during which workers added a new production line, improved ventilation after a fire in the paint shop, and overhauled machines across the factory. But even after the changes, there are kinks to work out. 

Suddenly, dozens of robots snap into frenzied action, picking up door panels, welding window pillars, taking measurements, and on and on. This robotic dance is a visceral representation of what Tesla chief executive Elon Musk has dubbed “Alien Dreadnought,” a code name for the factory that evokes an early 20th century warship, but with extraterrestrials.