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The Real-World Architects Who Built the Sci-Fi Dystopias of ‘Westworld’

The sleekly futuristic spaces of the HBO series borrow heavily from modern designers such as Santiago Calatrava and Zaha Hadid.

In “Westworld,” the New York City skyline of 2182 is dominated by some new architectural landmarks. 

In “Westworld,” the New York City skyline of 2182 is dominated by some new architectural landmarks. 

Photograph courtesy of HBO

The forecast doesn’t look great for New York City in 2182, according to the fourth season of the HBO series “Westworld.” 

To recap the basics of the dystopian science fiction epic, whose season finale airs on Sunday: Liberated from the show’s eponymous robot amusement park, the machines have turned the tables. By the late 22nd century, New York is the epicenter of a full-blown robo-pocalypse, one in which humans take their every cue from their cybernetic overlords. Mind-slaved to the whims of the algorithm, New Yorkers have become mere meat puppets in the hands of an angry artificial god (played by Tessa Thompson) who has captured the city using a woeful tower that stands where the Statue of Liberty once shined her beacon. The structure is the source of the sonic commands used to hypnotize humankind in an elaborate mass fiction, and a target for the handful of good robots and resistance fighters looking to rage against the machines.