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Prognosis

The First Commercial Brain Computer Interface Is Entering Human Trials

Elon Musk’s Neuralink is overtaken by a rival in a race to regulatory review.

The Stentrode brain-computer interface, implanted via procedures commonly used for neurovascular stent implantation, is designed to self-expand and grow into the blood vessels wall without obstructing blood flow.

The Stentrode brain-computer interface, implanted via procedures commonly used for neurovascular stent implantation, is designed to self-expand and grow into the blood vessels wall without obstructing blood flow.

Source: Synchron

Synchron Inc., which develops a so-called brain-computer interface and competes with Elon Musk’s Neuralink Corp., enrolled the first patient in its U.S. clinical trial, putting the company’s implant on a path toward possible regulatory approval for wider use in people with paralysis.

The early feasibility study is funded by the National Institutes of Health and will evaluate the safety of the device, known as the Stentrode, the New York-based company said. It will also assess how effective the Stentrode is in helping patients control digital devices hands-free.