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Madrid Bans Airbnb Apartments That Don’t Have Private Entrances

A new vacation rental law aims to ease the strain of tourism in central Madrid and spread the industry’s benefits to other parts of the city.
A bar and music venue in the Letras neighbourhood of central Madrid, an area increasingly dominated by the tourist industry
A bar and music venue in the Letras neighbourhood of central Madrid, an area increasingly dominated by the tourist industryPaul Hanna/Reuters

If your apartment doesn’t have its own private entrance, it can’t be listed on Airbnb.

That’s the latest vacation-rental law in Madrid, introduced last week as the city seeks to halt the tourism industry’s steady takeover of apartments in the city center. The law applies to any housing unit that is rented out for more than 90 days a year. Crucially, it would apply to units in taller buildings, too: Any home above ground would need its own private elevator or staircase, one that isn’t used by any other residents in the building. As of March 27, the municipality has the power to initiate proceedings that could lead to the removal of listings that break the law.