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Boeing Steps Up Airline Outreach on 737 Max After Lion Air Crash

  • Anti-stall feature has become the focus of crash investigation
  • Pilots unions want to know why system was left out of manuals
Investigators examine engine parts from Lion Air flight JT 610 on Nov. 7
Investigators examine engine parts from Lion Air flight JT 610 on Nov. 7Photographer: Bay Ismoyo/AFP via Getty Images

Boeing Co. is trying to assuage 737 Max customers concerned about a little-known anti-stall feature that has emerged as a focus of investigators probing a crash in Indonesia last month that killed 189 people.

Southwest Airlines, the largest 737 Max operator, American Airlines and United Airlines are among the carriers globally pressing Boeing for details of the formerly obscure system, representatives of the airlines say. The aircraft manufacturer first disclosed the possible link to the Lion Air crash on Nov. 7 and has been working with the Federal Aviation Administration to figure out the appropriate remedies, from updating software to improving pilot training.