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The Long Tail of a Storm

Five years after Superstorm Sandy, some effects still linger.
A red flag on the beach warns swimmers of high surf and dangerous currents in the Rockaways in October 2017, five years after the area was ravaged by Sandy.
A red flag on the beach warns swimmers of high surf and dangerous currents in the Rockaways in October 2017, five years after the area was ravaged by Sandy.Kathy Willens/AP

When Superstorm Sandy struck at the end of October 2012, the fallout was widespread and remarkable.

Some of the most overt consequences were immediate: signs of crisis were shouted through a bullhorn. Homes and buildings kneeled at the foundation; trees were yanked out by their roots. Water poured into subway stations, ruining electrical and mechanical systems. Power outages washed across the coast and toward the center of the country, all the way to Michigan and Ohio. Sewage seeped into bodies of water in D.C., Maryland, Virginia, and beyond.