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Paris Pushes Its Car-Free Streets Plan Even Further

Despite a backlash, the city will extend the areas that are off limits to private cars, making way for more bike lanes and public transit.
A rendering of how the Rue de Rivoli might look after its bike lanes have been installed.
A rendering of how the Rue de Rivoli might look after its bike lanes have been installed.paris.fr

When Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo banned cars from a large section of the River Seine’s quayside last autumn, she met a fierce backlash from pro-car advocates and some suburban mayors. As part of her annual New Year address on Friday, she outlined her response to this vocal resistance.

Rather than backtracking or mollifying critics, she’s going to push her pedestrianization measures even further. In autumn 2018, Paris will extend its car-free zone westward by a kilometer, install a guided bus line, and convert some space that’s currently used by cars into a two-way bike path. The openly declared objective: first to cut Paris’ car space by 50 percent, then ultimately rid central Paris of non-residents’ cars altogether. If Hidalgo has been rattled by criticism of her anti-car policies, she’s hiding it pretty well.