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Sorry, Hawks: Democrats Won't Pay a Political Price For Iran Filibuster

Senators get away with filibusters because ordinary Americans pay no attention to the minutiae of Senate procedure.
German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (L), French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (3rd L), China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi (4th L), High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini (C), US Secretary of State John Kerry (4th R), British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond (3rd R) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (R) meet at the table at the Palais Coburg Hotel, where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held, in Vienna, Austria on July 7, 2015. Talks seeking a landmark nuclear deal between Iran and major powers may yet fail, a German diplomatic source said during a break in negotiations in Vienna on the eve of a deadline. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

German Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier (L), French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius (3rd L), China's Foreign Minister Wang Yi (4th L), High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini (C), US Secretary of State John Kerry (4th R), British Foreign Minister Philip Hammond (3rd R) and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov (R) meet at the table at the Palais Coburg Hotel, where the Iran nuclear talks meetings are being held, in Vienna, Austria on July 7, 2015. Talks seeking a landmark nuclear deal between Iran and major powers may yet fail, a German diplomatic source said during a break in negotiations in Vienna on the eve of a deadline. AFP PHOTO / JOE KLAMAR (Photo credit should read JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images)

Photographer: JOE KLAMAR/AFP/Getty Images

Opponents of the Iran nuclear deal have all but accepted they cannot block the accord, as a growing number of congressional Democrats signal they'll supply the votes to sustain President Barack Obama's veto of a planned resolution of disapproval.

The question now is whether the resolution will even make it to Obama's desk. While passage by the Republican-controlled House is certain, Democrats in the Senate are planning to stop a resolution by using the filibuster to require a 60-vote super-majority to send it to the president. Republicans have 54 members in the Senate. Just two Senate Democrats have declared against the deal—New York's Chuck Schumer and New Jersey's Bob Menendez.