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What Some Conservatives Aren't Willing To Do To Kill Obamacare

There's an inside- versus outside-the-Beltway divide over strategy.
Scott Walker, governor of Wisconsin, speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The 42nd annual CPAC, which runs until Feb. 28, features most of the potential Republican candidates for president, from Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina to Jeb Bush and Scott Walker.

Scott Walker, governor of Wisconsin, speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., on Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015. The 42nd annual CPAC, which runs until Feb. 28, features most of the potential Republican candidates for president, from Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina to Jeb Bush and Scott Walker.

Photographer: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

When the Supreme Court last week swatted down a legal challenge that could have crippled a centerpiece of President Barack Obama's health-care law, it merely kicked the debate back from the legal to the political arena. Conservatives are still determined to fight Obamacare. But now, they're fighting over how to fight it.

The latest plan, floated by a couple of top-tier Republican presidential hopefuls, is already facing pushback from the right.