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What Would the 2016 Republican Hopefuls Do With an Iran Deal?

Some have promised to rip up an agreement if it doesn't include congressional approval; others are urging bipartisanship.
The United States flag flies at the top of the flag staff at the White House, Thursday afternoon, on January 25, 2007.

The United States flag flies at the top of the flag staff at the White House, Thursday afternoon, on January 25, 2007.

Photographer: Dennis Brock/Bloomberg

On Wednesday, Scott Walker became the latest potential Republican presidential candidate to say he would reject a nuclear deal between the U.S. and Iran if it's not approved by Congress. Speaking on Hugh Hewitt's radio show, the Wisconsin governor said he would "absolutely" reverse course on a deal on "day one" of his presidency, even if it were signed by President Barack Obama.

The ongoing negotiations have been a rallying point for 2016 contenders; the four Republican senators who are thinking about a presidential campaign—Ted Cruz, Lindsey Graham, Rand Paul, and Marco Rubio—all signed Senator Tom Cotton's letter to Iran's leaders warning that the next president could reject a deal. Here's what the contenders have said: