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5 Takeaways from Obama's Police Militarization Report

He still isn't ready to say what should be done about it.
Police and protesters meet at a line on South Florissant Avenue in Ferguson on Monday.

Police and protesters meet at a line on South Florissant Avenue in Ferguson on Monday.

Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch/TNS via Getty Images

Two weeks after police clashes with Ferguson protesters led questions about the federal government's program to send military equipment to state and local law enforcement departments, President Obama announced a formal review. Four months later, the White House released its findings. Here are five of the most important revelations:

The president is announcing two executive orders in conjunction with the report. One will establish a 90-day task force to figure out "how to promote effective crime reduction while building public trust" to be led by Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsay and George Mason University professor Laurie Robinson, a former Justice Department official. The other will give federal agencies with a stake in the issue, including the Defense and Justice departments, 120 days to develop their own recommendations which may (or may not) include lists of what equipment local law enforcement agencies are permitted to acquire. Sweeping changes to the programs initially sought by lawmakers appear to have stalled out amid pressure from the law enforcement community (our colleague David Weigel has a good look at the behind the scenes lobbying that led to that point here) and Obama's report only nudged the ball.