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Cybersecurity

Your Medical Records Are for Sale

Supposedly anonymous files give plenty of clues to patient identities
Your Medical Records Are for Sale
Photograph by Heimo Schmidt

As hospitals shift to digital medical records, administrators promise patients better care and shorter waits. They often neglect to mention that they share files with state health agencies, which in turn sell the information to private data-mining companies. The records are stripped of names and addresses, and there’s no evidence that data miners are doing the legwork to identify individual patients. Yet the records often contain patients’ ages, Zip Codes, and treatment dates—enough metadata for an inquiring mind to match names to files or for aggressive companies to target ads or hike insurance premiums.

Latanya Sweeney, the director of Harvard University’s Data Privacy Lab, identified 35 patients from a Washington database by buying state medical data and creating a simple software program to cross-reference that information with news reports and other public records. “All I have to know is a little bit about a person and when they went to a hospital, and I can find their medical record in this kind of data,” Sweeney says. She says data in 25 other states are just as vulnerable.