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Q: When Is a Cliff Dive Good For Sales? A: When It's Sponsored by Red Bull

Hassan Mouti of France dives from the 26-meter platform during the 2013 Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series in Cattai, New South Wales, Australia
Hassan Mouti of France dives from the 26-meter platform during the 2013 Red Bull Cliff Diving World Series in Cattai, New South Wales, AustraliaPhotograph by Dean Treml/AFP via Getty Images

Leaping, or merely dropping, from a height of 27 meters (88 feet), a 170-pound man accelerates to a speed of 50 miles per hour before hitting the surface below. If that surface is water, as it will be beneath the Saint Nicolas Tower in La Rochelle, France, at the Red Bull Cliff Dive Series opener this weekend, and the falling man is an expert diver, as the athletes in this contest surely are, he has a little over three seconds to dazzle the crowd with acrobatic twirls and whatnot and prepare himself to enter the water properly. Failing to do so could be catastrophic because 88 feet is roughly the equivalent of eight stories. Water, like concrete, isn’t compressible. If you were to belly-flop at 50 mph, you’d strike the water with more than 32 tons of force and almost certainly die. And that, of course, is critical to the thrill of witnessing these dives—about 70,000 gather in La Rochelle to watch in person—and why it’s a perfect addition to Red Bull’s perennial Olympics of arcane and perilous sports.

Starting in 1988 with the Red Bull Dolomitenmann, a four-sport (quadathlon?) wilderness race, the Austrian energy drink company has become the single most diversified corporate patron of sports the world over. It owns professional sports teams outright (e.g., Major League Soccer’s first place New York Red Bulls and the dominant Formula One racing outfits Toro Rosso and Red Bull). It produces a wide range of competitions (Red Bull X Fighters, Red Bull Music Academy). And it sponsors 600 athletes in sports as varied as BMX Supercross, free-skiing, ice-climbing, and snowboarding’s half-pipe. Along the way, it has mastered the art of the spectacle, or what might be called they-could-die marketing—epitomized by last year’s “Red Bull Stratos,” Felix Baumgartner’s fall to earth from 128,000 feet up, which was watched live by 8 million people around the globe. (A spokesperson for privately held Red Bull declined to share the metrics the company uses to assess the exposure the brand received for Baumgartner’s touchdown; his “supersonic” freefall has been viewed 34 million times on YouTube.)