These Are the Russia Ads That Social Media Companies Are Getting Blasted For

Some members of the Senate Intelligence Committee berated lawyers for social media giants Facebook Inc., Twitter Inc. and Alphabet Inc.'s Google for their lethargic response to Russian interference in U.S. politics, as the companies’ lawyers faced a second day of grilling in Congress.

The Intelligence Committee focused not just on Russian-backed advertising but to the extent to which unpaid posts and articles were used in an effort to manipulate American opinion and to create division.


A staff member arranges a display showing social media posts during a House Intelligence Committee hearing in Washington, D.C., on Nov. 1.

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

A "Down With Hillary!" event is advertised on the sponsored Facebook community "Being Patriotic." The post shows 763 reactions and the ad targeting data released with it states that it was intended for people interested in "Donald Trump, Donald Trump for President or Donald Trump Jr." The ad clicks were listed at 1,312 and the number of ad impressions stated were 15,255.

Source: Senate and House Intelligence Committees

A board showing a sponsored Facebook page for "Army of Jesus" depicts Hillary Clinton fighting Jesus during a Senate Judiciary Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee hearing in Washington, on Nov. 1.

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

The sponsored Facebook community "Being Patriotic" shows 1.2K reactions, 376 shares and the ad targeting data released with it states that the ad clicks were listed at 761 and the number of ad impressions stated were 3,362.

Source: Senate and House Intelligence Committees

A chart shows a sponsored Facebook page event for "Stop Islamization of Texas" on the same date and time, at the same location as a "United Muslims of America" event, during a Senate Judiciary Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee hearing in Washington, on Nov. 1.

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

The sponsored Facebook community "Blacktivist" shows 6.2K reactions, 29K shares and the ad targeting data released with it states that it was intended for people interested in "Human rights, African-American culture or Malcolm X." The ad clicks were listed at 13,310 and the number of ad impressions stated were 289,781.

Source: Senate and House Intelligence Committees

Senator Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat from Minnesota, highlights a Twitter post that spread misinformation, suggesting that people could vote for Hillary Clinton via text message during a Senate Judiciary Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee hearing in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 31. 

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

A Facebook ad sponsored by "Williams&Kalvin" claiming that "Danney Williams, 30, has been trying since at least 1999 to be acknowledged as the out-of-wedlock son of former President Bill Clinton and a black prostitute in Little Rock, Arkansas" shows 35 reactions, 29 shares and the ad targeting data released with it states that the ad clicks were 1,471 and the number of ad impressions stated were 15,453.

Source: Senate and House Intelligence Committees

Senator John Cornyn faces a display showing photographs of social media posts during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on social media influence in the 2016 U.S. elections in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, Nov. 1. 

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

The sponsored Facebook ad by "Donald Trump America" shows 3.9k reactions and had ad impressions of 34,943 with 6,276 ad clicks. The ad called for the removal of Hillary Clinton from the ballot.

Source: Senate and House Intelligence Committees

Cornyn speaks on Wednesday. 

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

A sponsored event by the "United Muslims of America" community on Facebook has a meeting place listed as the White House.

Source: Senate and House Intelligence Committees

Senator Richard Blumenthal gestures toward a display of a photo of comedian Aziz Ansari that had been altered and posted on Twitter suggesting that people could vote on election day via text message during a Senate Judiciary Crime and Terrorism Subcommittee hearing in Washington, D.C. on Oct. 31.

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg