In Pictures: Harvey Wreaks Havoc Across Texas

One way or another, the damage inflicted by Tropical Storm Harvey is likely to be felt for a very long time. It roared ashore Friday in Texas as a Category 4 hurricane, but by Sunday flooding had taken over as the main threat from the strongest storm to strike the U.S. since 2004, with up to 50 inches of rain forecast to fall in some areas. Several deaths have been attributed to the storm so far, thousands of people have been forced to flee their homes, flights at multiple Texas airports have been cancelled, and drinking water supplies, crops and energy production are also under threat. “It is simply a tragedy of epic proportions,” said Todd Crawford, chief meteorologist at The Weather Company in Andover, Massachusetts.

Rescue workers and volunteers help to rescue residents of an apartment complex in Houston, Texas on Aug. 30.

Photographer: Scott Olson/Getty Images

Houses stand immersed in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in West Columbia, Texas, on Aug. 30.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

A car gets towed while men walk in the flooded waters of Telephone Rd. in Houston, Texas on Aug. 30. 

Photographer: Thomas B. Shea/AFP via Getty Images

Workers begin repairs to a wall that was lost in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, in Rockport, Texas, on Aug. 30.

Photographer: Eric Gay/AP Photo

A highway stands immersed in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in West Columbia, Texas, on Aug. 30. 

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Trucks make their way through flood waters in Crosby, Texas on Aug. 30.

Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Bags of donated clothing sit at College Park High School in The Woodlands, Texas on Aug. 30.

Photographer: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Downtown Houston early morning on Aug. 30.

Photographer: Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

A home stands in floodwater in Houston, on Aug. 29.

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People wade through floodwater down Pine Cliff Drive in Houston as Addicks Reservoir nears capacity on Aug. 29.

Photographer: Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP Photo

Volunteer firefighters help a man down the stairs of a flooded house in the Concord Bridge neighborhood of Houston on Aug. 29.

Photographer: Michael Ciaglo/Houston Chronicle via AP Photo

A burned out home is surrounded by floodwaters in Spring, Texas, on Aug. 29

Photographer: David J. Phillip/AP Photo

A man waits in a motorboat while making rescues in Dickinson, Texas, on Aug. 29.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

People are helped out of a boat in Houston on Tuesday, Aug 29, 2017.

Source: The Washington Post/Getty Images

Rescue personnel drive through a flooded intersection in Dickinson, Texas, on Aug. 29.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Water from the Addicks Reservoir flows into surrounding neighborhoods in Houston on Tuesday, Aug. 29.

Photographer: David J. Phillip/AP Photo

Rescuers stand in a boat while looking for victims in floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey in The Woodlands, Texas, on Tuesday, Aug. 29. Estimates for damages caused by Hurricane Harvey are climbing with the storm poised to regain strength in the Gulf of Mexico before crashing back on land.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

U.S. President Donald Trump listens alongside Texas Governor Greg Abbott, left, and First Lady Melania Trump, during a firehouse briefing on Hurricane Harvey in Corpus Christi, Texas on Aug. 29.

Photographer: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

People take shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center in Houston on Aug. 29, 2017.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Evacuees are helped to dry land in Houston on Monday, Aug. 28.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

A person walks through a flooded street in Houston, on Monday Aug. 28.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People use an air mattress to evacuate their homes in Houston, on Monday Aug. 28. 

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Rescuers help a woman from a flooded retirement home into a boat after Hurricane Harvey in Spring, Texas, on Monday, Aug. 28.

Flood victims are towed to safety by a jet ski as floodwaters rise in Spring, Texas, on Monday, Aug. 28.

Photographer: David J. Phillip/AP

People walk down a flooded street as they evacuate their homes in Houston, on Aug. 28.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People wait to be rescued from their home after the area was inundated with flooding in Houston, on Aug. 28, 2017. Rain and rising floodwaters left Houston immersed and helpless, crippling a global center of the oil industry and testing the economic resiliency of a state that's home to almost 1 in 12 U.S. workers.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

People walk down a flooded street in Houston on Monday, Aug. 28. The city has dealt with deluges before, but elected officials, meteorologists and emergency managers all say there has never been anything like this before, and the downpour could last for days.

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Residents in the back of a truck climb aboard a boat to escape rising floodwaters in Spring, Texas, on Monday, Aug. 28.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

A truck driver walks past an abandoned truck while checking the depth of an underpass in Houston on Monday, August 28.

Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

A woman evacuates through the front door of her home in Spring, Texas, on Monday, Aug. 28.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Houses at the Highland Glen subdivision stand in floodwaters in Spring, Texas, on Monday, Aug. 28.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

A boy holds his grandmothers' dog after being rescued in Spring, Texas, on Monday, Aug. 28.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Residents sit in the back of a truck while waiting to be rescued from rising floodwaters in Spring, Texas, on Aug. 28.

Photographer: Luke Sharrett/Bloomberg

Houston Fire Department members motor through high water on North Braeswood Blvd. looking for victims of the flooding in Houston, on Monday, August 28.

Photographer: Erich Schlegel/Getty Images

A damaged home in Rockport, close to where Harvey made landfall. The heavy rain may last for days, and many people in the city are thought to be without flood insurance

Photographer: Alex Scott/Bloomberg

A man looks through a stack of boats jumbled in the wake of the storm. Winds reached speeds of up to 130 miles per hour as the storm hit on Friday. By Saturday afternoon it had dumped over a dozen inches of rain on some areas.

Photographer: Eric Gay/AP Photo

A woman makes her way out of the wreckage of her home as a neighbor offers to help her out of the window. She had been hiding in the shower after the storm blew her roof off and the walls caved in. 

Photographer: Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Submerged cars on a freeway near downtown Houston. Major roadways in Houston were flooded by Sunday morning, and in some places motorists were stranded for hours as off-ramps remained inundated. 

Photographer: Charlie Riedel/AP Photo

Cattle roam near Fulton, Texas, on Saturday, Aug. 26.

Photographer: Alex Scott/Bloomberg

Evacuated residents of Meyerland in southwest Houston wait on an overpass for further help. Hundreds of thousands of homes lost their power supply and flooding put drinking water supplies at risk. 

Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Meyerland residents walk along a deserted overpass. There’s no telling how long it will be until life in Texas gets back to normal, as flooding is set to continue.

Photographer: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

Flooding and rain in Rockport, Texas, on Saturday, Aug. 26.

Photographer: Alex Scott/Bloomberg

Evacuees take shelter at the Delco Center in east Austin, Texas, where the Red Cross is offering shelter for hundreds of people. Harvey will have “a tremendous impact on businesses, homes, property and the ability to travel in the entire Houston area,” said Dan Pydynowski, a meteorologist with AccuWeather Inc. in State College, Pennsylvania.

Photographer: Suzanne Cordeiro/AFP via Getty Images

A damaged bookstore in Rockport, Texas, on Saturday, Aug. 26.

Photographer: Alex Scott/Bloomberg