Founded in 1843, News of the World closed on July 10 after allegations that it obtained phone, medical and bank records from as many as 3,870 people ranging from celebrities, politicians and the police. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg
Founded in 1843, News of the World closed on July 10 after allegations that it obtained phone, medical and bank records from as many as 3,870 people ranging from celebrities, politicians and the police. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg

The Key Players in the News Corp. Phone Hacking Scandal

Farewell News of the World
Farewell News of the World
Founded in 1843, News of the World closed on July 10 after allegations that it obtained phone, medical and bank records from as many as 3,870 people ranging from celebrities, politicians and the police. Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg
Rupert Murdoch
Rupert Murdoch
News Corp. Chairman and CEO Rupert Murdoch said recent allegations that News of the World hacked phones and made payments to police is “deplorable and unacceptable.” Photographer: Oli Scarff/Getty Images
Rebekah Brooks
Rebekah Brooks
Rebekah Brooks, the CEO of News International, which owns News of the World, was editor of the tabloid from 2000 to 2003, during the period when phone hacking allegedly occurred. Photographer: Rex Features/AP
James Murdoch
James Murdoch
Deputy Chief Operating Officer James Murdoch oversees News Corp.’s Europe and Asian operations. Photographer: Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg
Andy Coulson
Andy Coulson
Andy Coulson was editor of News of the World from 2003 to 2007, when he became the Conservative Party communications director. Photographer: Ben Stansall/AFP/Getty Images
Clive Goodman
Clive Goodman
News of the World’s former royal editor Clive Goodman was sentenced in 2007 to four months for plotting to tap royal aides’ phones. Photographer: Suzanne Plunkett/Bloomberg
Glenn Mulcaire
Glenn Mulcaire
Private investigator Glenn Mulcaire was also sentenced in 2007 to six months on charges of hacking into messages of celebrities. Photographer: Rukhsana Hamid/Bloomberg
Gordon Brown
Gordon Brown
Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown says the Sunday Times accessed his bank account in 2000, and that in 2006 the Sun gained private medical records about his son. Photographer: Press Association/AP
John Yates
John Yates
In 2009, John Yates, assistant commissioner of the Metropolitan Police, reviewed a previous investigation into phone hacking at News of the World and determined there were no grounds for a further inquiry, a decision he later called “pretty crap.” Photographer: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
Les Hinton
Les Hinton
Les Hinton, the current CEO of Dow Jones, was the executive chairman of News International during the time phone hacking allegedly occurred. Photographer: Joshua Roberts/Bloomberg