Ohio

Snapshot: Ohio receives a poor score for ease of voting and a good score for ballot security. Its elected officials receive a good score for their response to claims about the 2020 election.

Ease of Voting

Some measures to expand access
3 out of 7 benchmarks

Ballot Security

Some measures to ensure accuracy and security
5 out of 8 benchmarks

What Politicians Say

Few responses that undermined the 2020 election
3 out of 4 benchmarks

Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose was among the Republican officials who were the most outspoken in pushing back against Donald Trump’s baseless claims of widespread voter fraud.

In an interview shortly after the election, he said that Joe Biden won, that states generally run elections well and that it was “irresponsible” to claim otherwise.

In the 2022 GOP primary, LaRose faced a challenge from former state Representative John Adams, who repeated conspiracy theories about Biden’s win.

LaRose shifted some of his rhetoric, saying that there were some “shenanigans” in 2020, but still declined to say that the election was stolen.

Trump endorsed LaRose anyway, and he defeated Adams with nearly two-thirds of the vote in the May primary.


Ease of Voting

Is the state making it easy for eligible voters to register and cast a ballot?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Ohio compares to other states
Ohio
Other states
← Easier to vote
Harder →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Ohio has not passed any major elections changes since 2020.


Ballot Security

Is the state following best practices to ensure ballot counting is accurate and timely?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Ohio compares to other states
Ohio
Other states
← More secure
Less secure →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

A provision in the state budget law bars elections officials from accepting private donations to run elections, such as the grants local and state officials asked for and received from Meta Platforms Inc Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg in 2020.

Read More: Zuckerberg’s Election Aid Spurs GOP Drive in 30 States to Ban It


How Politicians Responded to the 2020 Election

What did the state do in the aftermath of Trump's defeat?
Met 0 out of 0 benchmarks
How Ohio compares to other states
Ohio
Other states
← Fewer efforts to undermine 2020 election
More →
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Number of total benchmarks met

Republican Senate nominee JD Vance has claimed without evidence that there was massive fraud in the 2020 election as well as a “Big Tech” conspiracy from Zuckerberg and other Silicon Valley executives that cost Trump the election.

“There were certainly people voting illegally on a large-scale basis,” he said in an interview during the Republican primary.

Three Republican nominees for US House have also embraced Trump’s claims to varying degrees: Madison Gesiotto Gilbert has raised doubts about the election, former Trump staffer Max Miller helped plan the Jan. 6 rally on the National Mall and J.R. Majewski attended the rally.

Five of Ohio’s 12 Republican US representatives signed an amicus brief in support of a Texas lawsuit seeking to have the Supreme Court intervene.

Four objected to the certification of Biden electors from Arizona and five objected to Pennsylvania.


Read the full methodology
Story by: Ryan Teague Beckwith and Bill Allison
Graphics by: Paul Murray, Allison McCartney and Mira Rojanasakul
With assistance by: Rachael Dottle, Marie Patino, Jenny Zhang, Gregory Korte, Romy Varghese, Vincent Del Giudice, Nathan Crooks, Margaret Newkirk, Shruti Date Singh, David Welch, Elise Young, Dina Bass, Brendan Walsh, Carey Goldberg and Maria Wood
Editors: Wendy Benjaminson, Wes Kosova, Alex Tribou and Yue Qiu
Photo editors: Eugene Reznik, Marisa Gertz and Maria Wood
Photo credits: Getty Images, Bloomberg and AP Photo