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SOURCE: NATIONAL ARCHIVE/NEWSMAKERS

Two Words to End All Consideration of Trump

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A Very Short Case Against the Republican Candidate

Megan McArdle has two words for anyone considering a vote for Donald Trump on Tuesday: “nuclear holocaust.” It’s the best case against electing an impulsive man president (and really, you don’t need a second one).

Dismal Campaign Presages Crisis of Government

No matter who wins the election, the business of running the country will be even slower and more frustrating than it was before. Albert R. Hunt considers how government will work (hint: fitfully) with Trump or Clinton leading a divided country.

Election Day Is a Turning Point for the Supreme Court

At the same time, the next president could bring about epochal change in the politics of the high court — possibly the most profound shift in almost 30 years. Noah Feldman lays out the three most likely scenarios, depending on who wins the White House and Senate.

Financial Risk May Be China’s Gift to Next President

When Barack Obama first took office, the U.S. was fighting a financial crisis with some Chinese roots. Eight years later, Tom Orlik warns, the situation has nearly reversed: The next president could face a Chinese financial crunch with origins in the United States.

Question Authority, But Trust Science

Americans usually put their faith in scientists, but with some issues — say, climate change or evolution — they’re suddenly more likely to trust their gut feelings. Faye Flam considers how non-scientists can cultivate healthy skepticism without falling for science denialism.

Ritholtz’s Reads

  • London is already feeling the post-Brexit fallout (New York)
  • The Deutsche Bank downfall: How a pillar of German banking lost its way (Spiegel)
  • The “Facebook impact” on elections is real, and significant — just look at Hong Kong’s last vote (Quartz)

(Read Barry Ritholtz’s full daily news roundup.)

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This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.