The Fed's Missteps and a Hefty Dose of Bond Math

Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg View columnist. He founded Ritholtz Wealth Management and was chief executive and director of equity research at FusionIQ, a quantitative research firm. He blogs at the Big Picture and is the author of “Bailout Nation: How Greed and Easy Money Corrupted Wall Street and Shook the World Economy.”
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Quite the week. Finish it strong with our morning train reads:

• Years of Fed Missteps Fueled Disillusion With the Economy and Washington (WSJ)

• Pensions and bonds: the problem explained. Bond mathematics and the scale of pension deficits (FTsee also Target-dated funds are welcome but no panacea for pension holes (FT)

• Pundit or Professional? (Charlie Bilello)

• Data Geeks Are Taking Over Economics (Bloomberg View)

• Reconnecting Cuba: For international companies, the last Communist country in the Americas is a compelling market (strategy+business)

• Why people collect art (Aeon)

• Inside Facebook’s (Totally Insane, Unintentionally Gigantic, Hyperpartisan) Political-Media Machine (NYT)

• Peter Thiel Is Backing a Start-Up to Fund Other Lawsuits (Vanity Fair)

• Future iPhones might capture a thief’s photo and fingerprint when stolen: New patent application suggests covert data collection (Vergesee also Apple and Google join ‘strike force’ to crack down on robocalls (Verge)

• ‘Star Trek’ at 50: From Problem Child to Pop-Culture Perennial (WSJ)

Be sure to check out our Masters in Business interview this weekend with Gina Martin Adams, head of equity strategy at Wells Fargo.

Most countries aren’t close to the U.S. in manufacturing productivity

 
Source: Boston Consulting Group via Bloomberg

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This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

To contact the author of this story:
Barry Ritholtz at britholtz3@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
James Greiff at jgreiff@bloomberg.net