The Non-Story of Carson's Press Coverage

Jonathan Bernstein is a Bloomberg View columnist. He taught political science at the University of Texas at San Antonio and DePauw University and wrote A Plain Blog About Politics.
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1. At the Monkey Cage, Kalev Leetaru shows that while Donald Trump still gets plenty of attention, he no longer dominates the media coverage. Yes, it coincides with Trump’s polling slump -- according to HuffPollster, Trump peaked in early September, though he’s still lost only a few percentage points in national polling. As the caucuses and primaries draw closer, there’s more to report and it's harder for Trump to dominate; at the same time, his name recognition advantage could disappear in the early states.

2. Scott Lemieux hasn’t had enough of kicking Larry Lessig while he’s down. Can’t blame him, really. 

3. NBC’s Perry Bacon: Presidency scholars look at Trump’s comic-book version of the presidency.

4. Voters in New Hampshire tell Philip Klein that preferences are still highly unstructured. I’m far away and just reading polling and reporting, but that sounds correct to me. It will change.

5. Rebecca Traister at the Cut on liberal critics of Hillary Clinton and (some of) their gender resentments.

6. Harry Enten on how Chris Christie could win. Sure. Any candidate can have a polling surge. If Christie was suddenly at 15 percent nationally, he’d have a chance. I doubt it will be Christie, but I’d be surprised if we don’t get at least one more unexpected polling surge.  

7. Jonathan Chait on Rubionomics. I got this wrong; I assumed Jeb Bush would have the largest tax cut plan, just as his brother did in the 2000 cycle. Not even close. I was right that the Republican candidates would compete for largest deficit-exploding tax cut; I just got the winner wrong.

8. Chris Cillizza is correct: The media is treating Ben Carson about in the same way they treat any other candidate doing well in the polls. In my view, neither the West Point story or the “I was a violent kid” story are especially interesting, certainly not compared with Carson’s numerous policy whoppers -- but that’s how the media treats candidates.

9. And, yes, that includes how the press treated Barack Obama, conservative mythology notwithstanding.

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To contact the author of this story:
Jonathan Bernstein at jbernstein62@bloomberg.net

To contact the editor responsible for this story:
Max Berley at mberley@bloomberg.net