Donald Trump Leads Republican Pack Nationwide, Ahead in New Hampshire

His comments about Arizona Senator John McCain seem not to have deterred voters.

A security team stands guard as Republican presidential hopeful businessman Donald Trump speaks heads to a press conference following a rally on July 25, 2015 in Oskaloosa, Iowa.

Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images

New polls out Sunday show presidential candidate and real estate mogul Donald Trump still ahead among Republican hopefuls, even amid fallout from his controversial comments about Arizona Senator John McCain a week ago. 

A CNN/ORC poll out Sunday showed Trump leading the pack with 18 percent support among likely Republican voters nationwide, with former Florida Governor Jeb Bush in second place at 15 percent. And crucially, Trump's doing well in early-nominating states, two new NBC-Marist polls show. A New Hampshire poll had Trump leading with 21 percent. In Iowa, Trump is in second place, with 17 percent support, to Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker with 19 percent. 

"I'm not that surprised, because I see the kinds of crowds we're getting," Trump said on CNN's State of the Union. "These are great people and they want to see the country turned around." 

The polls are some of the first to have been conducted, at least in part, after Trump's comments on July 18 that McCain is only considered a war hero because he was captured during the Vietnam War. They show that fallout from the comments, considered incendiary by many Republican candidates, have had little impact on his strong poll standing.

The CNN/ORC poll reached 1,017 people by phone from July 22 to July 25. The margin of error was plus or minus 3.5 percentage points. The NBC/Marist Iowa poll reached 919 people from July 14 to July 21, with a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percentage points. The NBC/Marist New Hampshire poll  reached 910 registered voters from July 14 to July 21. The margin of error was plus or minus 3.2 percentage points

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