The 113th Congress Was the Second Least Productive in History

If not for President Obama signing 61 bills into law late last week, a new heir to the title of "Do-Nothing Congress" would have been named.

Scaffolding surrounds the U.S. Capitol Building Dome before sunrise, as seen from a taxi, in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2014.

Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg

Thanks to a last minute flurry of activity in the nation's capitol, this year's Congress narrowly avoided taking the title of  the"Do-Nothing Congress" of all time. 

In all, the 113th Congress, which is currently adjourned until the new year, had 296 bills signed into law over the course of two years, the Associated Press reports. That narrowly beat out the previous session's record for futility of 283 bills signed during a two-year period. 

The nickname "Do-Nothing Congress" originated with the 80th Congress, which met from 1947 through 1948, during President Harry Truman's time in office. As a sign of just how much political gridlock has become the norm in the nation's capitol, that memorialized session of Congress saw 906 of its bills signed into law. 

Were it not for 61 bills that President Obama signed into law on Thursday and Friday, the 113th Congress would have been the clear winner. 

Before it's here, it's on the Bloomberg Terminal.
LEARN MORE