Skip to content
Opinion
Lisa Jarvis

Crispr for the Masses Gets a Little Closer to Reality

The first patient has received Verve Therapeutics’ gene-editing drug, which treats heart disease by permanently lowering cholesterol. The trial will teach the field a lot about using the technology.

Base editing uses precise swaps of the building blocks of DNA.

Base editing uses precise swaps of the building blocks of DNA.

Photographer: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Corrected

A patient in New Zealand last week became the first person to be injected with a drug that is designed to powerfully and permanently lower cholesterol, ushering in a critical test of Crispr gene-editing technology.

If the drug from Verve Therapeutics works — and that’s still a big open question — it could someday be offered as a one-time shot to address the No. 1 killer in the US: heart disease.