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Tae Kim

Apple App-Store Ruling Should Make Tim Cook Sweat

A judge’s order in Epic Games' antitrust case against the iPhone maker is a big victory for developers and users and could be the start of a real reckoning for Big Tech.

A judge in a landmark antitrust case ruled with Apple on all counts but one — but that one count against it has big implications.

A judge in a landmark antitrust case ruled with Apple on all counts but one — but that one count against it has big implications.

Photographer: Chris Delmas/AFP

Apple Inc.’s dominance over the mobile-app economy has just suffered its first significant setback. It could mark the beginning of a real antitrust reckoning for the technology giant that may benefit the livelihoods of millions of app developers.

On Friday, U.S. District Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers issued her decision in a landmark antitrust suit brought by video-game publisher Epic Games Inc. against the iPhone maker. At first blush, it looked as if it was a resounding victory for Apple. Rogers ruled in the company’s favor on all counts but one, finding that Epic had failed to prove that Apple was a monopolist in the mobile-gaming market while also rejecting Epic’s requests for the ability to launch its own app store on Apple’s iOS operating system or allow users to install apps from third-party sources.