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Opinion
Eli Lake

A Book of Questions (But Not Answers) on Trump and Russia

An investigative reporter's book "Collusion" shows the growing list of troubling questions that shouldn't be ignored.
Trump's (unpaid) campaign manager worked for this guy. This guy worked for Vladimir Putin.

Trump's (unpaid) campaign manager worked for this guy. This guy worked for Vladimir Putin.

Photographer: Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images

If you are looking for a "case closed" indictment of President Donald Trump's collusion with Moscow, Luke Harding's new book is not it. Important questions are raised, but not answered. A better title than "Collusion" would have been "Maybe."

In a sense, the book is a fleshed-out version of the dossier commissioned by the Democratic National Committee and collected by former British spy Christopher Steele. Harding got some access to Steele, and Steele comes off as a professional reluctant to be the center of the story. An associate says in Harding's book that Steele believes 70 to 90 percent of the dossier is accurate. Steele says that the publication of his research is responsible for blocking Trump's early efforts to roll back sanctions on Russia.