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Opinion
The Editors

Raise the Cost of Cultivating Supergerms

Tax antibiotics for livestock now; save money (and lives) later.
Chicks feed in a broiler house on the outskirts of Hyderabad, India.

Chicks feed in a broiler house on the outskirts of Hyderabad, India.

Photographer: Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg

Antibiotics meant for humans have no place on the farm. When they are fed routinely to chickens, pigs and cows -- to help them grow or fend off infections -- germs in animals can easily become resistant, and ultimately threaten people, too.

It's a threat long recognized by Europe, the U.S. and Canada, where the use of antibiotics to promote growth in livestock has already or will soon be banned. Unfortunately, this progress is endangered by the ongoing, even expanding, antibiotics free-for-all taking place in countries where agriculture is less regulated.