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Megan McArdle

Want Communion? Pay Your Taxes

I don't recall Christ saying anything about an admission fee to hear him preach.
Some go in, more go out.

Some go in, more go out.

Photographer: Sean Gallup/Getty Images

The German Catholic Church is contemplating denying communion to Catholics who have ... wait for it ... declined to register as Catholics with the government. The reason? Those Catholics don't want to pay their "church tax." That's right: Germany taxes registered religious believers of major denominations, distributing that money to the country's churches, temples and the like. And it recently changed the rules for calculating the tax to include capital gains, prompting an exodus of presumably well-heeled Catholics from the official rolls. So the German church is threatening to cut them off. Lots of tax rules seem to be written on a pay-to-play basis, but I've never before heard of one that was "pay to pray." I don't recall Christ saying anything about an admission fee to hear him preach.

To American ears, this is positively shocking. The American Catholic Church certainly doesn't want you to take communion if you haven't been baptized by the church or confessed any mortal sins. But no one checks to see whether you made a deposit in the offering plate. What's going on here?