Photographer: Arturo Olmos/Bloomberg
Photographer: Arturo Olmos/Bloomberg

The Most Beautiful Ferraris Ever Made Are Coming to New York

In honor of the iconic Italian brand's 70th anniversary, 70 historic cars will appear in different locations around the city over Columbus Day weekend.  Photographs by Arturo Olmos/Bloomberg

This weekend more than $100 million worth of Ferraris will be on public display in New York.

Ferrari flew 70 of its most iconic models there to celebrate the brand’s 70 years of existence. It’s the last stop in a world tour of more than 60 countries where the brand held anniversary celebrations.

Key among the cars to be shown in New York is a 1964 250 LM Scuderia Filipinetti Ferrari valued at $19 million and the Ferrari that Michael Schumacher drove to victory in the Monaco Grand Prix in 2001. The latter, arguably the most important modern Formula 1 race car, will be the first auto ever sold at a Sotheby’s Contemporary Art sale. That car is expected to fetch as much as $4 million.

In the meantime, here’s a look at the Ferraris on display at Sotheby's on New York’s Upper East Side.

1964 250 LM Scuderia Filipinetti 
1964 250 LM Scuderia Filipinetti 

Ferrari will place 70 cars at various locations through the city over Columbus Day Weekend, including the Hublot Flagship Store, the Ferrari New York Showroom, Sotheby’s (seen here), and Rockefeller Plaza.

 

A Detail of the 1964 250 LM
A Detail of the 1964 250 LM

The 1964 250 LM Scuderia Filipinetti Ferrari has a V12 engine with a five-speed transmission. With 240 hp, it has a top speed of 287 km/hour. Scuderia Filipinetti was a famous Swiss racing team in the 1960s and 1970s, and the car even looks fast while standing still. A total of 32 were made.

Price range: $14 million–$19 million

1951 212 Inter
1951 212 Inter

The 70th anniversary festivities come at a crucial time for Ferrari, which is currently weighing the idea of producing a four-seat utility vehicle. At a private roundtable discussion in Carmel, Calif., Enrico Galliera, the brand's chief marketing and commercial officer, said anything that looked like an SUV “would be less aggressive in ... look and feel and performance, since we already have the aggressive performance [vehicles] with the V12 [812 Superfast] and the 488.”

A detail of the 1951 212 Inter
A detail of the 1951 212 Inter

The 1951 212 Inter Ferrari has a 150 horsepower V12 engine and a top speed of 124 mph. This exclusive 212 series was built in the early 1950s in both road-going and competition forms. They came in berlinetta, cabriolet, and coupé variants with coachwork by the world’s best at the time: Ghia, Ghia Aigle, Pininfarina, Stabilimenti Farina, Touring, Vignale, and the British firm Abbott. A total of 63 were made.

Price range: $1.5 million–$2.9 million

1957 250 GT Berlinetta
1957 250 GT Berlinetta

The 1957 250 GT Berlinetta has a 240-horsepower V12 engine with a four-speed manual transmission and a top speed of 252 km/hour. The model had Pininfarina coachwork and was Ferrari’s most successful early line, which included several racing and road-going variants.

Price range: $8 million–$12 million

The Interior of the 1957 250 GT Berlinetta
The Interior of the 1957 250 GT Berlinetta

The 3.0-liter V10 that Michael Schumacher raced to victory in Monaco in 2001 (it is not currently on display in this exhibit) will be sold along with works by Basquiat and Warhol at Sotheby’s Contemporary Art Evening Auction Nov. 16 in New York, following a weeklong display during Sotheby’s Hong Kong Autumn Sales. It will be the first collector car ever offered in a Sotheby’s art sale.

1958 250 GT Cabriolet
1958 250 GT Cabriolet

Of the 70 cars on view, many will be from modern years, such as the 1990 F40, the 2003 Enzo, and the 2010 F10. Enthusiasts can visit www.ferrari70nyc.com to download an app that allows them to check in to each location and win posters and other Ferrari paraphernalia.

 

The 1958 250 GT Cabriolet has a V12 240-horsepower engine and a top speed of 252 km/hour. This example, one of 36, was one of the very few that came with side vents and was fully restored to its original specifications in 1983. Early examples came with plexiglass windscreens and no wipers, with a headrest that flowed into the rear of the car, like a racecar’s would.

Price range: $6 million–$8 million

The rear of the 1958 250 GT Cabriolet
The rear of the 1958 250 GT Cabriolet

Ferrari’s 2015 initial public offering means plenty of money must be made to appease its new shareholders. Since then, company boss Sergio Marchionne has often characterized Ferrari as similar to Hermès in its valuation and potential. (Ferrari's shares have more than tripled over the past 18 months). Marchionne has set a target to boost Ferrari annual deliveries past 10,000 globally, roughly 2,000 more than the current output. It’s thought that a high-priced SUV would make up the difference.

1961 400 Superamerica
1961 400 Superamerica

The 1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica is extremely rare—a total of only seven were made. It has a V12 engine and four-speed manual transmission, with a tapered nose and slim look that were unmistakable and new at the time. With coachwork by Pininfarina, it made its debut in 1961 in Geneva.

Price range: $5 million–$8 million 

1963 275 GTB
1963 275 GTB

The 1963 275 GTB Ferrari has a V12, 280-horsepower engine and a top speed of 258 km/hour. The car was the replacement for the famous 250 series, along with its cooler sibling, the 275 GTS convertible. It came with an optional lightweight alloy body, which was revolutionary at the time.

Price range: $2 million – $4 million

The Rear of the 275 GTB
The Rear of the 275 GTB

The biggest grouping of Ferraris gathered in honor of the 70th anniversary, prior to the ones currently shown in New York, happened during the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where half a billion dollar’s worth of them were plunked down on the golf course lawn. The cars were then moved to Maranello, Italy, where RM Sotheby’s hosted an exclusive, record-setting, single-marque sale on the Fiorano Test Track. More than $76 million worth of cars were sold, led by a one-off LaFerrari Aperta, which sold for more than $10 million.

The dash of the 1963 275 GTB
The dash of the 1963 275 GTB

The hand-finishing on the interior details of these vintage Ferraris are part of what collectors note as an indication of maintenance and quality.

The Showroom
The Showroom

The exhibit, in total, showcases more than $28 million in vintage Ferraris.