Source: Bonhams
Source: Bonhams

The 15 Hottest Cars of the Pebble Beach Auctions

During this year's Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance on Aug. 21, the world's rarest, most beautiful—and most expensive—vintage and modern cars will converge for multiple auctions in Monterey, Calif. Collectors from all over the world will attend, hoping to score the next blue-chip brand on the rise. Hagerty predicts the weekend will reach $370 million in total sales. Here are the most notable cars that may get it there.
1932 Bugatti Type 55 Roadster
1932 Bugatti Type 55 Roadster

Offered by Gooding & Co.

Est. $10 million – $14 million

This blue baby is arguably the finest example of a roadster produced by Jean Bugatti. It raced at the 1932 Mille Miglia race in Italy and has had full restoration in 2013. It comes with a 8-cylinder engine and 130 horsepower on a four-speed manual gearbox. The car was initially unveiled in Paris in 1931 and was known for its blistering speeds, with a top speed of 110 mph.

Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

1979 Porsche 935 Paul Newman
1979 Porsche 935 Paul Newman

Offered by Gooding & Co. 

Est. $4.5 million to $5.5 million

This car won the Daytona and Sebring 24-hour endurance races. Paul Newman and his team drove it to second place at the 24 Hours of Le Mans. It has a flat six-cylinder engine and 750 horsepower on a four-speed manual transmission. It’s one of the most successful Porsches in racing history.

Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione
1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione

Offered by Gooding & Co. 

Est. $18 million to $20 million

One of only nine cars of its kind, this Ferrari is kitted out to exact competition specifications. It has a V12, 275-horsepower engine on a four-speed manual gearbox and a lightweight, aluminum body with alloy coachwork inside. This one, built on a special chassis, is one of the last LWD Spiders ever built. It’s considered the ultimate open-top Ferrari GT.

Photographer: Brian Henniker, courtesy of Gooding & Company

1981 Toyota FJ43 Land Cruiser
1981 Toyota FJ43 Land Cruiser

Offered by Gooding & Co. 

Est. $70,000 to $90,000

As Gooding points out in its catalog, the FJ43 is slightly longer and rarer than the famous Toyota FJ40, especially in the U.S. This one comes with an inline 6-cylinder engine and 135 horsepower on a five-speed manual gearbox. Front-wheel drive is there, too, of course. This one is your chance to get in on the super trendy FJ market—but still stand out.

Photographer: Mike Maez, courtesy of Gooding & Company

1994 Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau
1994 Porsche 964 Turbo 3.6 S Flachbau

Offered by Gooding & Co. 

Est. $1.4 million to $1.8 million

There are only 39 examples of this type of Porsche, and only two were painted white like this one. Porsche gave it a flat six-cylinder engine that gets 385 horsepower on a five-speed manual transmission, making it blisteringly fast on the road. This one is special for how perfectly it’s preserved—it has fewer than 40 miles on it, total, like a “time-capsule,” Gooding says.  It can only appreciate from here.

Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

2014 Ferrari LaFerrari
2014 Ferrari LaFerrari

Offered by Bonhams 

Est. $3.6 million to $4.2 million

The most iconic modern Ferrari, it has a V12, 963-hp engine and a seven-speed dual clutch transmission. Only 120 were delivered to the U.S. market, out of 499 made total. This one has only 230 miles on it, and it’s the first of its kind to be offered for sale publicly. It has Alcantara inner trim, a carbon fiber dashboard, and a Cavallino Rampante horse logo stitched into the headrests. It goes zero-62 mph in less than 3 seconds; it can hit 186 mph in less than 15 seconds.

Source: Bonhams

1961 5000 Maserati GT Coupe ‘Indianapolis’
1961 5000 Maserati GT Coupe ‘Indianapolis’

Offered by Gooding & Co. 

Est. $1.5 million to $2 million

One of only 34 built, this was the only car shown on the Maserati factory brochure when it was introduced. It has a twin-plug V8 engine and 325 horsepower on a four-speed manual gearbox. It was known at the time for being user-friendly and for its eager throttle response at high speed.

Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault, courtesy of Gooding & Company

1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix Racing Two-Seater
1931 Bugatti Type 51 Grand Prix Racing Two-Seater

Offered by Bonhams

Est. Available on request

The open-top beast has an eight-cylinder engine on a four-speed manual transmission; along with the Bugatti Type 50 road car and Type 51 Grand Prix car, this model introduced twin-overhead camshafts to Bugatti's brand. It comes in classic blue, and because of its chassis, power, and performance, is one of the most important Bugatti models in history. This is the first time this example has gone on sale at a public auction; it does run, though auctioneers say that an engine recommissioning is in order.

Source: Bonhams

1970 Dodge Challenger R/T SE Convertible
1970 Dodge Challenger R/T SE Convertible

Offered by Russo & Steele 

Est. Available on request

Here’s something different from all the European imports we’ll see at Pebble: the rare Dodge Challenger SE Convertible. It has a 440 six-pack engine on a six-speed transmission and was the muscle car when it came out in 1970. Only 61 of them were made, total, and only two of those were orange. This one also has very rare leather seats, tinted glass, chrome racing mirrors, and a power top.

Source: Russo and Steele

1965 Iso Grifo
1965 Iso Grifo

Offered by Mecum 

Est. $1.3 million to $1.5 million

This beautiful and niche Italian sports car is one of only 20 built, with a 400-hp, V8 engine and a four-speed manual transmission. It spent most of its life in a garage in Switzerland, so it's virtually pristine. The model was revered when it it made its debut for its horsepower, dependability, and relatively low cost.

Photographer: David Newhardt, Courtesy of Mecum Auctions

1955 Jaguar D-Type
1955 Jaguar D-Type

Offered by RM Sotheby’s

Est. $20 million to $25 million

As the most beautiful racing Jaguar ever made, this D-Type also packs a punch: It has a 250-horsepower inline six-cylinder engine and a four-speed manual transmission. Top speed was more than 170 mph. That was enough to get it the win at Le Mans in 1956. Since then, it has had only two private owners. As one of the first cars to use a steel monobody, it is one of the most expensive, if not the most expensive, Jaguars in the world.

Photographer: Patrick Ernzen, courtesy of RM Sotheby's

2004 Ford GT PB2-1
2004 Ford GT PB2-1

Offered by Russo & Steele

Est. $5 million to $7 million

This is “The Sign-off,” the last preproduction-build Ford GT. It’s a prototype, so it’s not suitable for street use, but it is the last tangible piece of its kind in Ford history. The current odometer has more than 50,000 miles—all track-tested.

Source: Russo and Steele

1955 Lancia Aurelia B24S Spider America
1955 Lancia Aurelia B24S Spider America

Offered by Bonhams 

Est. $1.2 million to $1.5 million

The all-alloy V6 engine gets 118 hp on a four-speed manual transmission; it has had only five owners and fewer than 63,000 miles on it. It’s the perfect option to drive in such rallies as the Mille Miglia. The custom wraparound windshield, Pininfarina coachwork, and shield front grill were all massively unique. Top speed: 115 mph.

Source: Bonhams

1964 Shelby 289 “Competition” Cobra CSX 2473
1964 Shelby 289 “Competition” Cobra CSX 2473

Offered by RM Sotheby’s 

Est. $2.2 million to $2.6 million

It has a 450-hp, eight-cylinder engine on a four-speed manual transmission. This one, created by Carroll Shelby himself, won massive races—it’s the winningest Cobra in existence today. But it’s also very drivable, even on the L.A. roads and highways its California owners have used since the early '60s. The black paint exterior and white racing stripes, short roll bar and racing-perfect specs make the car truly unique.

Photographer: Patrick Ernzen, courtesy of RM Sothebys

1967 Toyota 2000GT
1967 Toyota 2000GT

Offered by Mecum

Est. $750,000 to $900,000

This is the most beautiful super sports car Japan has ever produced. It is extremely rare in the United States—only 62 cars were built for the U.S.; Toyota made 350 of them, total. It comes with a 150 hp, five-speed manual transmission with red exterior paint and a black interior. This example is in perfect, pristine condition. Even James Bond loved it.

Photographer: David Newhardt, courtesy of Mecum Auctions