Photographer: Patrick Ernzen

The Most Expensive Vintage Cars From Amelia Island’s $134 Million Weekend

This year's vintage car auctions at Amelia Island were quite a scene: Overall, Gooding & Co., RM Sotheby's, and Bonhams sold lots totaling $134 million, up from $114.9 million last year. The average sale prices per auto was up, too, hitting $437,834 per car, compared to $324,466 in 2015. Here's a list of the top 10 sellers.

  1. $17,160,000 — 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California SWB Spider
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    $17,160,000 — 1961 Ferrari 250 GT California SWB Spider

    One of only 37 covered-headlight SWB California Spiders, this Gooding & Co. lot was the top-selling car for the weekend. It has had only three owners and was never previously offered for public sale.

    Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault/Courtesy of Gooding & Company

  2. $9,735,000 — 1937 Bugatti Type 57 SC Sports Tourer
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    $9,735,000 — 1937 Bugatti Type 57 SC Sports Tourer

    The Tourer comes with a supercharged V8 engine, paired with a four-speed manual transmission and was sold by Bonhams. When it debuted in 1934, it marked Jean Bugatti's reign as Bugatti's leader and creative driving force. Analysts consider it one of the most collectible cars ever.

    Photographer: Pawel Litwinski/Courtesy of Bonham's

  3.  $5,335,000 — 1955 Porsche 550 Spyder
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    $5,335,000 — 1955 Porsche 550 Spyder

    One of the Porsches from Jerry Seinfeld's collection, this Spyder was built in limited numbers and is among the most alluring models of its time. (James Dean and racing star Hans Herrmann were fans.) It is totally unrestored and in exceptional form—a coup for Gooding & Co.

    Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault/Courtesy of Gooding & Company

  4. $4,400,000 — 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupe
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    $4,400,000 — 1962 Ferrari 400 Superamerica Coupe

    This special coupe offered by RM Sotheby's is one of only 18 made, with a coach-built interior, V12 engine, and competition-style specs that include the headlights. It has been restored with all correct parts and components, including the appropriate tan interior and a paint job in the original fine "Blu Chiaro Metallizzato" color from the Pininfarina paint-chip book.

    Photographer: Patrick Ernzen ©2016 Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

  5. $3,300,000 — 1966 Ford GT40 Mk I Coupe
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    $3,300,000 — 1966 Ford GT40 Mk I Coupe

    This car comes with four Le Mans wins and is one of only 31 ever built for road use. The color is the original "Azure Blue" (without racing stripes) and was used by Ford for promotional purposes. Gooding & Co. auctioned it.

    Photographer: Brian Henniker/Courtesy of Gooding & Company

  6. $3,000,000 — 1973 Porsche 917/30 Can-Am Spyder
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    $3,000,000 — 1973 Porsche 917/30 Can-Am Spyder

    Another member of the Jerry Seinfeld Collection sold by Gooding & Co., this is the most powerful road-racing Porsche ever built. One of only six examples produced, it represents the final evolution of the famous Porsche 917 model.

    Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault/Courtesy of Gooding & Company

  7. $2,970,000 — 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet A
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    $2,970,000 — 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540K Cabriolet A

    Sold by Bonhams, this is the most noteworthy car Mercedes built in the 1930s. It has been totally restored to correctly reflect the light interior and pristine components of the time. Fewer than 400 were built, each with 178 horsepower on a four-speed gearbox.

    Photographer: Pawel Litwinski/Courtesy of Bonham's

  8. $2,860,000 — 1959 Porsche 718 RSK Roadster
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    $2,860,000 — 1959 Porsche 718 RSK Roadster

    This Roadster, from the Jerry Seinfeld Collection and sold by Gooding & Co., is one of only 34 Type 718 RSK Spyders ever built. It was renowned for its sub-2,000-pound body weight and exceptional horsepower (140hp) for the time. The car has been fully restored.

    Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault/Courtesy of Gooding & Company

  9. $2,750,000 — 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Coupe
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    $2,750,000 — 1967 Ferrari 275 GTB/4 Coupe

    This V12 coupe was known for its masculine good looks and tough driving  style. It could hit 60 miles per hour in 5.5 seconds, very fast for its day, and it could easily cruise at 130 mph. Top speed was 160 mph. This extremely rare example, sold by Bonhams, is mostly original, with all the correct bodywork and components.

    Photographer: Patrick Ernzen/Courtesy of Bonham's

  10.  $2,640,000 — 1931 Duesenberg Model J Murphy Convertible Coupe
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    $2,640,000 — 1931 Duesenberg Model J Murphy Convertible Coupe

    This Model J was considered the crown jewel of the Duesenberg company at the time. It could easily exceed 100 mph, which was very fast for its time, and came with a three-speed manual transmission set at 265hp. The lot was sold by Gooding & Co.

    Photographer: Mathieu Heurtault/Courtesy of Gooding & Company

  11. Surprise Underseller — 1968 Ferrari 330 GTS
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    Surprise Underseller — 1968 Ferrari 330 GTS

    The weekend provided one surprise: Overall, pre-1975 Ferraris didn't sell as well as expected. Despite the top-selling 1961 Ferrari (above) that beat estimates, five out of eight pre-'75 Ferraris sold for near to or less than their lowest-expected values, including this 1968 Ferrari 330 GTS that sold for $2 million at RM Sotheby's. It had been expected to take nearly a half million dollars in addition. 

    Photographer: Darin Schnabel ©2016 Courtesy of RM Sothebys/Darin Schnabel ©2016 Courtesy of RM Sothebys