Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg
Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

Nine Can’t-Miss, New Watches From 2016’s First Luxury Expo

The year's first luxury watch show, the Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie (SIHH), is wrapping up in Switzerland. Hundreds of new watches were released at the fair itself, as well as from brands during the week in Geneva. They ranging from simple $1,000 pieces to wild concept watches costing more than $1 million. We've sifted through it all, and here are nine can't-miss, new models for 2016.
Cartier Rotonde de Cartier Astromystérieux
Cartier Rotonde de Cartier Astromystérieux

Inspired by the Cartier mystery clocks of the early 20th century—which suspended the hands freely, with no apparent connection to mechanics—the Astromystérieux takes this a step farther. The movement is suspended between two sapphire crystals and the entire thing rotates once per hour with the minutes hand. $181,000

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

IWC Pilot's Watch 36
IWC Pilot's Watch 36

This is a perfect example of a brand listening to its customers. For years, collectors have clamored for more modestly sized pilot watches, and IWC finally decided to oblige. There are five variations with different dial and strap options, and all the hallmarks of the pilot (the triangle at 12 o'clock, the wide hands, and the bold numerals) are intact across the range. $3,950

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

Bovet Ottanta Sei
Bovet Ottanta Sei

Teaming up with Italian car design house Pininfarina, Bovet created a highly technical but extremely sporty watch. The Ottanta Sei has a highly skeletonized flying tourbillon movement that displays the time and the long, 10-day power reserve. That caliber is suspended in a titanium and sapphire case, and the whole thing weighs just 15.54 grams. It's not the first collaboration between the two brands, but it's definitely the best. From 160,000 CHF (approximately $158,000)

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

A. Lange & Söhne Richard Lange Jumping Seconds
A. Lange & Söhne Richard Lange Jumping Seconds

It might looks simple, but this is one very complicated watch. The three hands show the hours, minutes, and seconds on three different registers. The large, center seconds hand is a deadbeat, meaning that it ticks instead of sweeping, showing off the precision of the mechanics. It also has a constant-force mechanism, so it runs accurately throughout the 42 hours of power reserve. This is Lange at its finest. 78,000 Euro (approximately $85,000)

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

Panerai Lo Scienziato
Panerai Lo Scienziato

When Panerai starts experimenting, good things happen. The Lo Scienziato's movement has an angled tourbillon regulator, shows a second time zone, and is ornately open-worked to show off all the components and reduce weight. The 47-millimeter case wears like a normal Panerai Luminor, but it's produced with a special titanium deposition technique similar to 3D printing. The PAM of the future has landed. $143,000

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

Greubel Forsey Signature 1
Greubel Forsey Signature 1

Meet the new entry level watch from Greubel Forsey. The Signature 1 doesn't have any tourbillon and is a three-hand watch. But it's a Greubel Forsey through and through, meaning that every component is painstakingly made and hand-finished in-house to the very highest standards. The coolest thing? Only 66 pieces will be made, and half will be in stainless steel. From 155,000 CHF (approximately $153,000) 

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

Laurent Ferrier Galet Traveller Boréal
Laurent Ferrier Galet Traveller Boréal

Named for the Northern Lights, the Galet Traveller Boréal mixes some of the most traditional and modern elements in watchmaking. The so-called "sector" pattern on the dial is as classic as it gets, as are the large, sword-shaped hands. But in a twist, they both have been filled flush with either beige or green Superluminova so they glow bright green when the lights go out. Against the tone-on-tone black dial, the lume really shines brightly and will keep you staring at your wrist long after you've learned what time it is. 55,000 CHF (approximately $55,000)

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

Piaget Emperador Coussin XL 700P
Piaget Emperador Coussin XL 700P

This is a totally new kind of watch for Piaget. Instead of a traditional mechanical movement, the 700P uses a special hybrid that relies on a mechanical power source but keeps time with a quartz regulator. Instead of making a ticking sound the watch hums, and the movement is designed to let you see the whole mechanism at work without having to turn the watch over. $70,000

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg

H. Moser Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Concept
H. Moser Endeavour Perpetual Calendar Concept

This might be the most understated perpetual calendar ever made. It follows on the heels of H. Moser's first branding-free concept watch and does away with all text on the dial, other than the numeral for the date. The tiny arrow moves around once per year to show the month ,and the power reserve on the left is up when it's full and down when it's empty. Even the seconds register was removed to show off the fumé dial and keep clutter to a minimum. Think of this as luxurious anti-luxury. $66,000

Photographer: Stephen Pulvirent/Bloomberg