These Wastebaskets Are Anything but Trashy

Furniture designers turn their eyes to the humble office garbage can
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Kaktus stool by Enrico Bressan for Artecnica
Kaktus stool by Enrico Bressan for Artecnica

Smart for a small space, even though it’s expensive. If you empty it out and turn it over, the cast aluminum frame can double as a chair. For trash, you’ll obviously want a bag.

$362.50; yliving.com

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
Bin Bin waste paper basket by John Brauer for Essey
Bin Bin waste paper basket by John Brauer for Essey

As a designer, Brauer is into symbolic functionalism, in which form points to function. You might as well use this one for crumpled paper. Be careful with food or leaking pens, though—it stains easily.

$50; lumens.com

 

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
Waste basket by Gino Colombini for Kartell
Waste basket by Gino Colombini for Kartell

A translucent coating gives it a classic Sixties vibe, making it much more sophisticated than your average plastic receptacle. Available in a half-dozen colors to add pop under your desk.

$69; designpublic.com

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
Corner can by Alan Wisniewski for Umbra
Corner can by Alan Wisniewski for Umbra

Flared at the top so you can fit more inside. An “inner retention ring” holds a plastic bag in place. And the lid reduces office odor, while also hiding your leftover lunch.

$10; umbra.com

 

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
Wire-framed trash bin by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply
Wire-framed trash bin by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply

It’s an update on a once-popular midcentury model that’s now out of production and impossible to find. Schoolhouse Electric molds its out of steel at a factory in Portland, Ore.

$125; schoolhouseelectric.com

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
In Attesa wastebasket by Enzo Mari for Danese Milano
In Attesa wastebasket by Enzo Mari for Danese Milano

Made by an Italian design legend, it’s sliced at an angle so it leans toward you for easy tossing. You’ll no longer need to go crawling under your desk to retrieve detritus.

$69; allmodern.com

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
Gold waste can by CB2
Gold waste can by CB2

A gleaming riff on Oscar the Grouch’s hangout, made in India from galvanized iron. It’s incredibly lightweight, if a bit flimsy, but the handles make it simple to move around.

$49.95; cb2.com

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant
Asbury metal wastebasket by Bed Bath & Beyond
Asbury metal wastebasket by Bed Bath & Beyond

Coated metal—like this one’s lightweight steel—is the most practical for everyday use. It comes in several seaside-inspired hues that, with the nautical rope handles, give your décor a hint of escapism.

$9.99; bedbathandbeyond.com

 

Photographer: Sarah Anne Ward for Bloomberg Businessweek; Set Design: Dave Bryant