Gas is flared off on an offshore oil and gas platform off the coast of Long Beach, California, on May 18, 2010

Photographer: Tim Rue/Bloomberg

Gas is flared off on an offshore oil and gas platform off the coast of Long Beach, California, on May 18, 2010

Photographer: Tim Rue/Bloomberg

Biggest Winners and Losers of the Oil Price Crash

Happy Filipinos; unhappy private equity moguls
Winner: U.S. Dollar
Winner: U.S. Dollar
The U.S. is sending fewer dollars overseas to pay for its oil imports, helping to strengthen the greenback. That, in turn, magnifies oil's drop, since barrels are priced in dollars.
Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg
Loser: Inflation Targets
Loser: Inflation Targets
Cheaper energy is pushing down prices at a time when central banks want more inflation, to prevent a sharp decline in prices and wages.
Photographer: Westend61/Getty Images
Winners: Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Kuwait
Winners: Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Kuwait
These wealthy producers are determined to protect their market share. They can handle lower prices.
Photographer: Fayez Nureldine/AFP via Getty Images
Losers: Venezuela, Iran and Nigeria
Losers: Venezuela, Iran and Nigeria
OPEC's weaker members need higher prices but can't afford to cut production.
Photographer: The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images
Winner: Zach Schreiber
Winner: Zach Schreiber
The head of hedge fund PointState Capital told investors at a conference last May that crude oil prices were about to drop and showed a slide of a car stuffed with clowns. His fund made about $1 billion on that bet.
Photographer: Chris Goodney/Bloomberg
Losers: Buyout Moguls
Losers: Buyout Moguls
Oil losses sank year-over-year profits for David Rubenstein's Carlyle Group (down 65 percent; Rubenstein shown here), Leon Black's Apollo (79 percent drop) and Henry Kravis's KKR (down 94 percent). The private equity gang had invested heavily in the industry during the boom years.
Photographer: Simon Dawson/Bloomberg
Winner: The Philippines
Winner: The Philippines
Economic growth in the island nation, which imports almost all its oil, will accelerate to 7.6 percent on average in the next two years with oil at $40 a barrel, according to Oxford Economics Ltd.
Photographer: Dondi Tawatao/Getty Images
Loser: Greenland
Loser: Greenland
Dreams of a drilling boom — and economic independence — have vanished as prices collapsed.
Photographer: DeAgostini/Getty Images
Winner: Tankers
Winner: Tankers
Ship owners get more cargoes and cheaper fuel at the same time. Traders may even hire tankers as floating storage.
Photographer: Ryan Lindsay/Getty Images
Loser: Deepwater Drilling
Loser: Deepwater Drilling
Projects conditioned on higher prices don't make sense in the new oil era, according to Goldman Sachs.
Photographer: Tim Rue/Bloomberg