A full moon on Jan. 3, 2015. The International Space Stations orbits the Earth every 93 minutes--less time than it takes to watch an average movie--and approximately 16 times a day.

Photographer: ISS/NASA

A full moon on Jan. 3, 2015. The International Space Stations orbits the Earth every 93 minutes--less time than it takes to watch an average movie--and approximately 16 times a day.

Photographer: ISS/NASA

Spectacular Views of the Earth From Low Orbit

Orbiting the earth 16 times each day at over 17,000 miles per hour makes for some cool photos.

When the Deep Space Climate Observatory launches this weekend, it will carry sophisticated tools a million miles sunward, to keep an eye on the Earth. That distance will allow it to see the Earth's whole sunlit disk at once. The International Space Station and Earth-orbiting satellites can't do that -- but look at all the amazing things they can do. 

Over the Moon
Over the Moon
A full moon on Jan. 3, 2015. The International Space Station orbits the Earth every 93 minutes--less time than it takes to watch an average movie. That's approximately 16 times a day.
Photographer: ISS/NASA
The Soyuz Undocks
The Soyuz Undocks
The Soyuz TMA-13M Russian Spacecraft undocks from the ISS on Nov. 10, 2014. After 6 months in space the Soyuz was bringing home Expedition 41 crew members Max Suraev of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Reid Wiseman of NASA and Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency.
Photographer: ISS/NASA
Above a Cyclone
Above a Cyclone
This shot of Cyclone Chedza, headed for Madagascar, was taken by a member of Expedition 42 on the International Space Station on Jan. 11, 2015. Expedition 42 will end in May. The next crew will stay aboard for a one year stint.
Photographer: ISS/NASA
You Missed a Spot
You Missed a Spot
U.S. Astronaut Barry Wilmore looks out of the Cupola viewing station while on a break from science and maintenance duties. The Cupola is a control tower for the ISS, attached to the nadir side of the space station and also gives a full panoramic view of the Earth.
Photographer: ISS/NASA
Cupola House
Cupola House
The Cupola houses one of the space station's two robotic work stations used by astronauts to manipulate the large robotic arm seen through the right window. The robotic arm, or Canadarm2, was used throughout the construction of the station and is still used to grapple visiting cargo vehicles and assist astronauts during spacewalks, shown on Jan. 4, 2015.
Photographer: NASA
The Alps
The Alps
Flight Engineer Samantha Cristoforetti of the European Space Agency (ESA) took this photograph of the Alps, and posted it to social media on Dec. 23, 2014. She wrote, "I'm biased, but aren't the Alps from space spectacular? What a foggy day on the Po plane, though! #Italy"
Photographer: NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti
Great Lakes
Great Lakes
Commander Barry Wilmore took this photograph of the Great Lakes and central U.S. on Dec. 7, 2014. This week on the station, the crew has been busy with medical science and spacesuit work while preparing for the arrival of SpaceX's Dragon commercial cargo craft.
Photographer: Barry Wilmore/NASA
Maintenance
Maintenance
ESA Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti performs maintenance on a controller panel assembly in the Tranquility module on Dec. 29, 2014. Life on board the ISS is one of constant maintenance and working with hundreds of experiments.
Photographer: ISS/NASA
Rocky Mountain High
Rocky Mountain High
Marking the 100th anniversary of the Rocky Mountain National Park on Jan. 26, 2015, Flight Engineer Terry Virts tweeted, "Majestic peaks and trails! Happy 100th anniversary @RockyNPS So much beauty to behold in our @NatlParkService."
Photographer: Terry Virts/NASA
Sunrise
Sunrise
A rising Sun, on Jan. 18, 2015.
Photographer: ISS/NASA