Quick fixes for the grooming woes of summer.

Photograph by Darama/Corbis

Quick fixes for the grooming woes of summer.

Photograph by Darama/Corbis

It's Hot Out. Gross

Summer Grooming Tips
Summer Grooming Tips

Quick fixes for the grooming woes of summer.

Photograph by Darama/Corbis
Winter Weight Gain
Winter Weight Gain

For winter weight gain: Research published in the International Journal of Obesity found that intermittent fasting, or skipping a meal a day a few times a week, can help the body burn fat and drop a few pounds quickly.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Pale Skin
Pale Skin

For pale skin: Self-tanners are like smartphones: More advanced ones come out every year. The newest formulas incorporate oil, which softens the skin as it helps color spread more evenly and last longer (St. Tropez Self Tan Luxe Dry Oil, $50; sephora.com).

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Fading Nail Polish
Fading Nail Polish

For fading nail polish: Apply a clear top coat with UV protection (Deborah Lippmann’s On a Clear Day, $20; deborahlippmann.com), which prevents pale hues from turning yellow and darker ones from lightening. Don’t rub sunscreen on your nails, because the chemicals cause pigment to wear away faster.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Reeking Shoes
Reeking Shoes

For reeking shoes: Eliminate—don’t just cover up—the smell by shoving wadded-up newspaper in the toe box when shoes are wet from sweat or rain. Shoe air fresheners (Happy Feet Sneaker Balls, $7.50; amazon.com) also work surprisingly well.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Sunspots and Heat Rash
Sunspots and Heat Rash

For sunspots and heat rash: Serums with skin-brightening ingredients, such as retinol or vitamin C, can help fade dark spots (Origins Mega-Bright Skin Tone Correcting Serum, $75; origins.com). Hydrocortisone cream calms blotchy, sun-irritated limbs, Chapas says.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Intense Arm Hair
Intense Arm Hair

For intense arm hair: Personal body hair trimmers thin out the hair but leave the root intact, preventing ugly—and painful—ingrowns (Norelco Click & Style, $69.99; philips.com).

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Body Odor Baked Into Clothes
Body Odor Baked Into Clothes

For body odor baked into clothes: Jolie Kerr, author of My Boyfriend Barfed in My Handbag … And Other Things You Can’t Ask Martha, suggests a one-time wash with a small amount of regular detergent and a cup of white vinegar during the rinse cycle. If the clothes are dry clean only and can get wet—not silk—spritz with a mixture of vinegar and water, then air-dry. (They won’t smell like vinegar.)

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Sunburned Head
Sunburned Head

For sunburned head: Protect a vulnerable scalp, whether exposed because of a buzz cut or a bald spot, with a styling product that offers SPF (Axe Buzz Cut Look Cream, $6; amazon.com). Regular sunscreen makes hair look greasy.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Excessive Sweat
Excessive Sweat

For excessive sweat: Antiperspirant works best when you’re sweating the least, says Dr. David Pariser, a co-founder of the International Hyperhidrosis Society. Apply it at night, and don’t worry about scrubbing it off during your morning shower—it’s already penetrated into your sweat ducts and will last all day.

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Ingrown Stubble
Ingrown Stubble

For ingrown stubble: One session of laser hair removal will help follicles grow in more slowly and thinly and prevent buried ones for six weeks, says Dr. Anne Chapas of Union Square Laser Dermatology.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek
Dried-Out Locks
Dried-Out Locks

For dried-out locks: Before swimming in a chlorinated pool, slick a moisturizing mask on your hair (Klorane Mask With Mango Butter, $24; drugstore.com). Or, in a pinch, use coconut or olive oil, which block the water from being absorbed, stylist Paul Labrecque says.

Photograph by Elizabeth Renstrom for Bloomberg Businessweek