Office-to-off-duty options.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy

Office-to-off-duty options.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy

Five Holiday Party Outfits You Can Also Wear to Work

Outfits for day to evening
Outfits for day to evening

Office-to-off-duty options.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
For the local dive-bar gathering
For the local dive-bar gathering

Festive sweater, check.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
For the glitzy affair
For the glitzy affair

Party shoes on.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
For the catered dinner
For the catered dinner

A suit, naturally.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
For the conference-room toast
For the conference-room toast

Your Champagne moment.

Photograph by Boru O’Brien O’Connell for Bloomberg Businessweek; Hair: Megan Lanoux; Makeup: Lydia Foster; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
Styling tips for the hectic season
Styling tips for the hectic season

Put Down the Ironic Holiday Sweater

There was a time when you could wear a nerdy reindeer sweater and be viewed as clever. Then BuzzFeed happened, and now it seems everyone’s looking for ways to be “nostalgic”—including Target, Walmart, and Macy’s. All are selling brand-new, vintage-looking Christmas sweaters. The NBA is making team versions. There’s a Coke Zero-sponsored “Tacky Holiday Sweater Generator.” Your friend’s theme party has become a marketing concept. Not a funny-ugly one. An ugly one. Winter sweaters are still great, especially Fair Isle or even featuring tiny jacquard snowflakes. That’s festive. Enough.

Illustration by Gilbert Ford for Businessweek; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
Party shoes that work at work
Party shoes that work at work
Illustration by Gilbert Ford for Businessweek; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
Go ahead, break up your suit
Go ahead, break up your suit

1: Everyday suit trousers pair well with a blazer or sport coat in a thicker fabric: wool, corduroy, or tweed. 

2: If you go bolder on top—with a pattern, a color, a fabric such as velvet, or double-breasted—keep the pants neutral and solid. Or jeans, if the dress code allows.

3: A solid white shirt and simple tie will ground the look. Don’t contrast a too-light jacket with too-dark pants, or vice versa.

Photograph by Gallery Stock; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
The 5-minute bathroom updo
The 5-minute bathroom updo

Try a braided bun. Abby Swan, of Marie Robinson Salon, explains

Illustration by Gilbert Ford for Businessweek; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy
Bet long on skirts
Bet long on skirts

Evening gown? Not for daytime. Miniskirt? At the office, no way. When dressing for after-work events, a smart wager is a pencil skirt that hits at the knee or a trendier midcalf silhouette in a delicate fabric such as lace or silk brocade. Even better if it’s metallic or otherwise shines. Balance out the riskier length with a trim sweater in a neutral color. Then finish the outfit with feminine, not-as-chunky heels, tall enough to keep legs from looking truncated.

Photograph by Per Zennström/Gallery Stock; Market editor: Shibon Kennedy