Attendees exit Istanbul Fashion Week, held March 12-16, 2013. The event showcases Turkish fashions and is a platform for Turkish designers and brands.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

Attendees exit Istanbul Fashion Week, held March 12-16, 2013. The event showcases Turkish fashions and is a platform for Turkish designers and brands.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

In Islamic Turkey, Fashionable but Conservative

Attendees exit Istanbul Fashion Week, held March 12-16, 2013. The event showcases Turkish fashions and is a platform for Turkish designers and brands.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

Models walk the runway of a show during Istanbul Fashion Week.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

The fall/winter show of Argande, a more traditional line of Turkish clothing, at Istanbul Fashion Week.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

Hasema, a conservative swimwear store in the Fatih district of Istanbul.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

Shoppers in Fatih, which is known as one of the most conservative districts in Istanbul.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

A saleswoman at Armine, a store that specializes in head scarves for women and is a one-stop shop for middle-class Muslims. The retailer has a house apparel brand, shoes, and soon handbags, to be made in the same Chinese factory that makes Michael Kors bags. Armine apparel and accessories are sold in 1,400 stores, including in the U.S., the Netherlands, and Britain. Gross revenue in 2012 was $56 million. “I would like to be the conservative Hermès further down the line,” Chief Executive Officer Mehmet Dursun says.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

Filiz Yetim, a bridal gown designer in her studio in the Camlica district of Istanbul. The going price averages $4,000 to $5,000—not much for a handmade item. Yetim says she’ll charge more in time. “In two years, this vision of personal fashion will be more established, and we will ask what is due,” she says.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

A fashion shoot for Ala, the first magazine in Turkey for conservative Muslim women. Ala means “the most beautiful of the beautiful.” Its office doesn’t feel like a bastion of traditional Islam: The talk is of models, photo shoots, deadlines, and accessories.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

A fashion shoot for Ala at Bretz Home in Kemerburgaz, outside Istanbul.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek

Another moment from the fashion shoot for Ala at Bretz Home.

Photograph by Monique Jaques for Bloomberg Businessweek