The second Barack Obama administration officially began on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013, when he was sworn in by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts. The parties and other celebrations begin on Monday, soon after Obama takes the oath outside the U.S. Capitol and delivers his inaugural address. For dozens of companies, the festivities are an opportunity to put their shoes, cheese, crystal, and other goods and services before Washington's power elite. Here's a guide to 2013 inauguration product placement.

Photograph by Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The second Barack Obama administration officially began on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013, when he was sworn in by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts. The parties and other celebrations begin on Monday, soon after Obama takes the oath outside the U.S. Capitol and delivers his inaugural address. For dozens of companies, the festivities are an opportunity to put their shoes, cheese, crystal, and other goods and services before Washington's power elite. Here's a guide to 2013 inauguration product placement.

Photograph by Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Battling for Brand Placement at Obama's Inauguration

Hail to the Cheese
Hail to the Cheese

The second Barack Obama administration officially began on Sunday, Jan. 20, 2013, when he was sworn in by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts. The parties and other celebrations begin on Monday, soon after Obama takes the oath outside the U.S. Capitol and delivers his inaugural address. For dozens of companies, the festivities are an opportunity to put their shoes, cheese, crystal, and other goods and services before Washington's power elite. Here's a guide to 2013 inauguration product placement.

Photograph by Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images
Allen Edmonds
Allen Edmonds
Until 2009, Wisconsin shoemaker Allen Edmonds had shod every President on inauguration day since Ronald Reagan, and maybe back to Jimmy Carter. (The Carter record is fuzzy). In 2009 the company came up short despite a long effort to get President Obama to wear its classic Park Avenue and a new model, the Hyde Park.It's trying again this year. "We're hoping to get in touch with the valet and offer to send a new pair, "says CEO Paul Grangaard. "It's a new day. It's a new inauguration. I would like him to reconsider his choice."
Source: Allen Edmonds
J Crew
J Crew
After First Lady Michelle Obama wore a pair of green leather gloves from J. Crew to hold the Lincoln Bible for her husband in 2009, the company's website crashed from the surge in traffic. In a paper titled "The Michelle Markup," David Yermack, a professor at New York University's Stern School of Business, found the First Lady's public appearances in 2009 "led to immediate gains exceeding an estimated $5 billion in shareholder value for her clothiers."
Photograph by Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Lenox
Lenox
For the seventh consecutive inauguration Pennsylvania crystal and china maker Lenox will be presenting "the official Inaugural gifts from the American people" to the President and Vice President. Lenox does not offer replicas of the one-of-kind pieces or market other inaugural collectibles. "The impact on our business is somewhat small," writes Tim Carder, Lenox's vice president of design, "but overall, this initiative reinforces our commitment to quality and excellence in the consumer's mind."
Photograph by Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images
Korbel Natural
Korbel Natural
When the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies (JCCIC) announced the menu for the luncheon, it listed "Korbel Natural, Special Inaugural Cuvee Champagne, California." That wording drew the ire of the Champagne Bureau, a D.C. lobby for French wineries. U.S. law allows bubbly makers to call their product champagne as long as they've been in business since 2006 and put the origin upfront in the name. "Under the law, the label for this wine would state 'California Champagne,'" Sam Heitner, director of the Champagne Bureau told <i>The Hill</i>. Margie Healy, a Korbel spokeswoman, says the labels for the 90 custom Magnum bottles follow the rules. "We're talking about the Presidential Inauguration," Healy says, "that's what people ought to be focusing on and not a comma in a press release." Heitner says the complaint has been addressed and the wording on the menu now follows the rules.
Photograph by PRNewsfoto via AP Photo
Richard Blanco
Richard Blanco

When President Obama named Richard Blanco the 2013 inaugural poet, his books immediately surfaced in Amazon's bestseller list for American poetry. "On Friday, he had three in the top ten," says Maria Sticco, publicist for University of Pittsburgh Press, which publishes two of Blanco's books. "We were blown away by that." Sticco says the press immediately printed an additional 3,000 copies of last year's Looking for the Gulf Motel (original print run: 1,500) and 1,300 copies of 1998's City of a Hundred Fires (original run: 1,200).

Photograph by Nikki Moustaki/AP Photo
Chobani and Fage
Chobani and Fage
Fage started the Greek yogurt craze in the U.S. in 1998. Chobani, the 2005 upstart, is now the best-selling yogurt in the country. Both make yogurt in New York. For 24 hours, it looked like Senator Charles Schumer might take a side in the state's yogurt war. On Jan. 10, he announced that vanilla and plain Fage would be offered to the President and his guest before the swearing-in, along with strawberries, pineapples, pears, and granola topping. The next day, he announced that Chobani would also be there. "Senator Schumer is personally a big fan of both Fage and Chobani yogurt," writes JCCIC spokesman Matt House in an email.
Photograph by Bill Trojan/The Leader-Herald via AP Photo
New York Farm Products
New York Farm Products
New York Senator Charles Schumer chairs the Joint Congressional Committee on Inaugural Ceremonies, which throws the inaugural luncheon where about 200 of the uber-elite will dine with the President after he is sworn in. Sen. Schumer is not shy about using the occasion to showcase New York agriculture. This year's menu includes two wines, apples, cheese, honey, maple syrup, and two yogurts. Three Finger Lakes winemakers--Peter Bell of Fox Run, Johannes Reinhardt of Anthony Road, and David Whiting of Red Newt--collaborate to make Tierce Riesling, which will be served with Maine lobster tails. "We get a lot of calls of people wanting to enjoy this particular this particular Riesling next Monday night with dinner," says Whiting. It will cost them $30 a bottle.
Photograph by Ty Wright/Bloomberg