The devastating hurricane upturned the lives of millions as it blasted across the Caribbean and into the U.S., where it made landfall on Oct. 29 in New Jersey. At least 62 deaths are being attributed to Sandy in the Northeast, bringing the death toll to more than 130, according to news reports. More than 8.2 million people in the U.S. lost electricity, according to the U.S. Energy Dept., and insured losses may exceed $6 billion in the U.S., according to estimates from Kinetic Analysis, compiled by Bloomberg. Left, a house is destroyed by heavy flooding from Hurricane Sandy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Oct. 25. For a look at Sandy's effects, flip through this slideshow, based on Bloomberg News reports.

Photograph by Thony BelizaireAFP/Getty Images

The devastating hurricane upturned the lives of millions as it blasted across the Caribbean and into the U.S., where it made landfall on Oct. 29 in New Jersey. At least 62 deaths are being attributed to Sandy in the Northeast, bringing the death toll to more than 130, according to news reports. More than 8.2 million people in the U.S. lost electricity, according to the U.S. Energy Dept., and insured losses may exceed $6 billion in the U.S., according to estimates from Kinetic Analysis, compiled by Bloomberg. Left, a house is destroyed by heavy flooding from Hurricane Sandy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Oct. 25. For a look at Sandy's effects, flip through this slideshow, based on Bloomberg News reports.

Photograph by Thony BelizaireAFP/Getty Images

Sandy's Path of Destruction

Sandy's Path of Destruction
Sandy's Path of Destruction

The devastating hurricane upturned the lives of millions as it blasted across the Caribbean and into the U.S., where it made landfall on Oct. 29 in New Jersey. At least 62 deaths are being attributed to Sandy in the Northeast, bringing the death toll to more than 130, according to news reports. More than 8.2 million people in the U.S. lost electricity, according to the U.S. Energy Dept., and insured losses may exceed $6 billion in the U.S., according to estimates from Kinetic Analysis, compiled by Bloomberg. Left, a house is destroyed by heavy flooding from Hurricane Sandy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Oct. 25. For a look at Sandy's effects, flip through this slideshow, based on Bloomberg News reports.

Photograph by Thony BelizaireAFP/Getty Images
More Than $20 Billion
More Than $20 Billion

On Oct. 29 in Manhattan, a crane partially collapsed and was dangling off a luxury residential building under construction. It's an example of one of the many structures affected by Sandy, whose economic toll is expected to exceed $20 billion, according to Eqecat.

Photograph by Allison Joyce/Getty Images
The Biggest Blackout Since 2003
The Biggest Blackout Since 2003

Hurricane Sandy cut power to more than 2 million electricity customers in New York and left much of lower Manhattan blacked out. More than 8.2 million were without power across the country, according to the U.S. Energy Dept. It was the biggest U.S. blackout since 2003.

Photograph by Allison Joyce/Getty Images
Widespread Flooding
Widespread Flooding

Water rushed into the Carey Tunnel (previously the Brooklyn Battery Tunnel) on Oct. 29 in Manhattan's Financial District. It was the worst disaster in the 108-year history of the New York City subway system and exceeded transit officials' worst-case scenario, said Joseph Lhota, chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Photograph by Andrew Burton/Getty Images
Capsize on the Bounty
Capsize on the Bounty

One person was killed and another was missing after the crew of the HMS Bounty, a replica of the vessel that was the scene of a 1789 mutiny, abandoned ship when it capsized in 18-foot seas on Oct. 29.

Photograph by Petty Officer 2nd Class Tim Kuklewski/ /U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images
Widespread Flooding
Widespread Flooding

Major bridges, including the Brooklyn Bridge and the Manhattan Bridge (pictured here, with flooding shown below it) were closed. Seven subway tunnels under the East River flooded.

Photograph by Bebeto Matthews/AP Photo
Snow in Time for Halloween
Snow in Time for Halloween

During the storm, more than two feet of snow fell in western Maryland and nearly as much in West Virginia, according to the U.S. Hydrometeorological Prediction Center.

Photograph by Rick Barbero/The Register-Herald/AP Photo
'No Words to Describe' the Damage
'No Words to Describe' the Damage

Flooding and high winds arrive along North Michigan Avenue in Atlantic City, N.J., on Oct. 29. "There are no words to describe what's been New Jersey's experience over the last 24 hours, and what we'll have to contend with over the coming days, weeks, and months," Governor Chris Christie said at an Oct. 30 news conference.

Photograph by Michael Ein/The Press of Atlantic City/AP Photo
Cotton Output
Cotton Output

Cotton output in North Carolina, the fifth-largest U.S. grower, may drop as much as 12 percent because of Hurricane Sandy, according to Bill Peele at Impact Agronomics, who has been advising state farmers since 1984. In this photo, waves crash onto the damaged Avalon Pier in Kill Devil Hills, N.C., on Oct. 29.

Photograph by Gerry Broome/AP Photo
The New World Trade Center
The New World Trade Center

Sea water poured into Manhattan's new World Trade Center construction site on Oct. 29. "It appears that we have not sustained any lasting damage to our existing properties or at our World Trade Center buildings currently under construction," Silverstein Properties said on Oct. 30 in an emailed statement.

Photograph by John Minchillo/AP Photo
Evacuating Patients in Lower Manhattan
Evacuating Patients in Lower Manhattan

NYU's Langone Medical Center began evacuating patients to other medical facilities on Oct. 29 after the storm interrupted power and the backup system failed. NYU Hospital's board of directors knew that the facility's generators were outdated and at risk before their failure, said Gary Cohn, a trustee who is also president of Goldman Sachs, in an interview on Oct. 30 on Bloomberg Television.

Photograph by John Minchillo/AP Photo
Jamaica Weathers the Storm
Jamaica Weathers the Storm

On Jamaica, 70 percent of the island lost power, roofs were torn from homes, and roads were blocked by downed trees and floods as Sandy roared ashore on Oct. 24, according to catastrophe modelling firm AIR Worldwide. It was the first hurricane to make a direct hit on Jamaica since Hurricane Gilbert 24 years ago. In the photo, waves crash on a house in the Caribbean Terrace neighborhood in eastern Kingston, Jamaica, on Oct. 24.

Photograph by Collin Reid/AP Photo
Cuba Also Feels the Effects
Cuba Also Feels the Effects

A man tries to recover his belongings from his house destroyed by Hurricane Sandy in Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, on Oct. 25, when the storm crossed the island. Most of the deaths caused by Sandy in the Caribbean were in Haiti.

Photograph by Franklin Reyes/AP Photo
The Highest Death Toll in the Caribbean
The Highest Death Toll in the Caribbean

Hurricane Sandy caused at least 52 deaths in Haiti, according to news reports. The new devastation will make it even harder to quell the ongoing cholera outbreak that followed a catastrophic earthquake in January 2010.

Photograph by Thony Belizaire/AFP/ Getty Images
Obama Weighs In
Obama Weighs In

U.S. President Barack Obama spoke at the Red Cross headquarters about ongoing relief in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, on Oct. 30 in Washington, D.C. He declared the situation a "major disaster" for large areas of the East Coast, including New York City.

Photograph by Chris Kleponis/Pool via Getty Images