When it comes to commenting on current events and trends in the B-school marketplace, we hear a lot from administrators, professors, and even employers. But rarely do we hear from business students themselves.

In this recurring feature, "Heard on Campus," Bloomberg Businessweek has recruited student journalists at some of the country's top university newspapers to capture the B-school pulse from the people who are actually living it. In this installment we ask: "Are you concerned about the job market?"

Here's what business students had to say. (Some responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

When it comes to commenting on current events and trends in the B-school marketplace, we hear a lot from administrators, professors, and even employers. But rarely do we hear from business students themselves.

In this recurring feature, "Heard on Campus," Bloomberg Businessweek has recruited student journalists at some of the country's top university newspapers to capture the B-school pulse from the people who are actually living it. In this installment we ask: "Are you concerned about the job market?"

Here's what business students had to say. (Some responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Heard on Campus: Concern About the Job Market

Where are the Jobs?
Where are the Jobs?

When it comes to commenting on current events and trends in the B-school marketplace, we hear a lot from administrators, professors, and even employers. But rarely do we hear from business students themselves.

In this recurring feature, "Heard on Campus," Bloomberg Businessweek has recruited student journalists at some of the country's top university newspapers to capture the B-school pulse from the people who are actually living it. In this installment we ask: "Are you concerned about the job market?"

Here's what business students had to say. (Some responses have been edited for length and clarity.)

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
Cornell University's Johnson Graduate School of Management
Cornell University's Johnson Graduate School of Management
Natalie Lin, 29, MBA candidate: “Certainly, the macro trends are concerning. Johnson has done a good job of placing us first-years in internships and supporting our career search, so I almost feel insulated from it. But the reality doesn’t escape me, either, so of course I’m concerned.” —As told to Michael Linhorst of the Cornell Daily Sun
Courtesy Michael Linhorst/Cornell Daily Sun
Duke University's Fuqua School of Business
Duke University's Fuqua School of Business
Catherine Shea, 29, PhD candidate: “Of course. Who wouldn’t be concerned? But I feel like I’ve gotten enough support here that it will be O.K.” —As told to Taylor Doherty and Lindsey Rupp of the Chronicle at Duke University
Courtesy Taylor Doherty/The Chronicle
University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business
University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business
Meghan O’Neil, 26, MBA candidate: “Two years ago the economy was in worse shape than it is right now. We’ve seen it pick up last year, and this year we’ve seen a lot more people pick up jobs. There’s going to continue to be an upward trend.” —As told to Chris Masoud of the Observer at Notre Dame
Courtesy Chris Masoud/The Observer
Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business
Dartmouth College's Tuck School of Business
Adrien Germain-Thomas, 31, MBA candidate: “As an international student, one of the first questions I asked myself is, ‘What country do I want to work in?’ I definitely took into account salary and post-graduation employment. I’m worried about the situation in France, and I’m not considering going back to France after this. The world is drastically changing in terms of where the growth is coming from. For a very long time, growth was generated by developed economies. Most of the growth in the world today is coming from emerging economies. Tuck has a great emphasis on this, and students are year after year more willing to take the challenge of going into an exciting macroeconomic environment where there are opportunities, where you can take initiative, where deals don’t need to be overthought over weeks and weeks and weeks but where you just need to get things done.” —As told to Katie Gonzalez of The Dartmouth
Courtesy Katie Gonzalez/The Dartmouth
Duke University's Fuqua School of Business
Duke University's Fuqua School of Business
Minming Gu, 28, MBA candidate: “This year, I think, isn't as good as last year when we were looking at internships, but overall more people are getting jobs. I don't think the U.S. market is as good as some other markets—for example, my home country—but again, it’s not that bad.” —As told to Taylor Doherty and Lindsey Rupp of the Chronicle at Duke University
Courtesy Taylor Doherty/The Chronicle
Harvard Business School
Harvard Business School
Omar Lim, 26, MBA candidate: “No, I’m not really looking for a job. I’m going to start my own company.” —As told to Gina Hackett of the Harvard Crimson
Courtesy Gina Hackett/The Harvard Crimson
UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business
UC Berkeley's Haas School of Business
Joe Wadcan, 29, MBA candidate: "As a whole, I'm not concerned about the job market because technology has created entirely new industries and jobs, much of which [are] centered here in the Bay Area. However, I do believe people are not getting the right training and education to participate fully in these emerging industries. Learning technology has gone from an added qualification to a requirement, and job seekers need to adapt." —As told to Jamie Applegate of the Daily Californian
Courtesy Kevin Ho Nguyen/The Daily Californian
University of Michigan's Ross School of Business
University of Michigan's Ross School of Business
Erica Horwitz, 28, MBA candidate: “Personally, no, because I’ve secured my job almost a year ago at this point. Generally, yes. Things are volatile. Banks are laying off people pretty regularly. I think it’s concerning, but from an immediate standpoint I’m not concerned.” —As told to Haley Goldberg of the Michigan Daily
Courtesy Marissa McClain/The Michigan Daily
University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business
University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business
Kathryn Pelletier, 30, MBA candidate: "Overall I’ve seen areas of concern, especially in the financial sector. It’s incredibly important to come into business school with an open mind, to express interest in different things. Wherever there’s a job that fits your experience and skill set, you should go after it and take it for the sake of the experience and the exposure to the different companies." —As told to Chris Masoud of the Observer at Notre Dame
Courtesy Chris Masoud/The Observer