Under the terms of their divorce settlement, Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt has until Apr. 30 to pay his ex-wife Jamie $131 million—money he expects to raise by selling the team out of bankruptcy. On Nov. 1, the Dodgers and Major League Baseball agreed to the endgame: McCourt would sell the team, and promptly, but only if a bankruptcy judge, and not Commissioner Bud Selig, oversaw the process “in a manner designed to realize maximum value for the Dodgers and their owner Frank McCourt.” (Selig had wanted to seize the team.) All of which set the stage for a deal-making frenzy the likes of which Los Angeles hasn’t seen since Michael Milken was hosting his Predators Balls in the ’80s.

“It’s a sports-business circus here,” says David Carter, executive director of the Sports Business Institute at the University of Southern California. “Every day you see that someone else is throwing their hat in the ring or partnering with somebody.”

McCourt likely aims to fetch in excess of $1.5 billion for the team—a record price for a sports franchise. Click ahead for a look at some prominent figures in the Dodgers ownership picture.

Under the terms of their divorce settlement, Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt has until Apr. 30 to pay his ex-wife Jamie $131 million—money he expects to raise by selling the team out of bankruptcy. On Nov. 1, the Dodgers and Major League Baseball agreed to the endgame: McCourt would sell the team, and promptly, but only if a bankruptcy judge, and not Commissioner Bud Selig, oversaw the process “in a manner designed to realize maximum value for the Dodgers and their owner Frank McCourt.” (Selig had wanted to seize the team.) All of which set the stage for a deal-making frenzy the likes of which Los Angeles hasn’t seen since Michael Milken was hosting his Predators Balls in the ’80s.

“It’s a sports-business circus here,” says David Carter, executive director of the Sports Business Institute at the University of Southern California. “Every day you see that someone else is throwing their hat in the ring or partnering with somebody.”

McCourt likely aims to fetch in excess of $1.5 billion for the team—a record price for a sports franchise. Click ahead for a look at some prominent figures in the Dodgers ownership picture.

Would-Be Dodgers Owners

Players in the Dodgers Ownership Contest
Players in the Dodgers Ownership Contest

Under the terms of their divorce settlement, Los Angeles Dodgers owner Frank McCourt has until Apr. 30 to pay his ex-wife Jamie $131 million—money he expects to raise by selling the team out of bankruptcy. On Nov. 1, the Dodgers and Major League Baseball agreed to the endgame: McCourt would sell the team, and promptly, but only if a bankruptcy judge, and not Commissioner Bud Selig, oversaw the process “in a manner designed to realize maximum value for the Dodgers and their owner Frank McCourt.” (Selig had wanted to seize the team.) All of which set the stage for a deal-making frenzy the likes of which Los Angeles hasn’t seen since Michael Milken was hosting his Predators Balls in the ’80s.

“It’s a sports-business circus here,” says David Carter, executive director of the Sports Business Institute at the University of Southern California. “Every day you see that someone else is throwing their hat in the ring or partnering with somebody.”

McCourt likely aims to fetch in excess of $1.5 billion for the team—a record price for a sports franchise. Click ahead for a look at some prominent figures in the Dodgers ownership picture.

Joe Torre
Joe Torre

The future Hall of Famer has joined forces with Rick Caruso

Stan Kroenke
Stan Kroenke

“Silent Stan’s” standoff in St. Louis could end in a Rams-Dodgers complex

Arn Tellem
Arn Tellem

Agent whose clients include Kobe and Gasol now hopes to be an owner

Peter O'Malley
Peter O'Malley

Seeks redemption for selling the team to News Corp. in 1998

Leo Hindery
Leo Hindery

Sees the Dodgers as a way to build a West Coast YES Network

Magic Johnson
Magic Johnson

Eager for the front office after selling his Lakers stake

Steven Cohen
Steven Cohen

Failed to buy the New York Mets, has the money the Dodgers need

Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong
Dr. Patrick Soon-Shiong

The richest man in L.A. is good friends with Magic Johnson

Ron Burkle
Ron Burkle

Grocery mogul has billions, Angeleno friends to impress

Rick Caruso
Rick Caruso

Youngest-ever commissioner for L.A.’s Water and Power Dept., the developer wants to be mayor

Alan Casden
Alan Casden

The billionaire bid for the Dodgers before, in 2003. He can imagine a new ballpark. “They knock down stadiums all the time.”

Stanley Stalford
Stanley Stalford

The real estate developer wants the Dodgers to sell shares in the team to fans through an IPO